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I saw this comment the other day:

... mañana vamos a ir a tirar tiempo hasta San Javier

I think this must mean something like

... tomorrow we're going to waste time [or fool around] until San Javier

but I'm not sure if that's the correct translation of the idiom. I get the sense it means they're not going to do anything of consequence until the San Javier event.

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On simple words? , Yes.

Waste of Time , in Spanish: Pérdida de Tiempo, it doesn't mean 100% killing time is more like the literal translation (or meaning in your case, an English speaker presumably).

Fool around , in Spanish: Tontear, Hacer Hora, Matar el Rato, Pasar el Rato (notice: el rato or hora in this Spanish Expressions means time without any time placement (future, past, present, present tense).

My Recommendation is to use:

  • Perder el Tiempo

if you wanna say literally WASTING TIME

and

  • Pasar el rato

if you wanna say FOOLING AROUND.

Also ,the expression:

... mañana vamos a ir a tirar tiempo hasta San Javier

doesn't have a correct syntax, it sound like an obvious bad translation or a "barbarian construction" (Spanish: un Barbarismo, sentence who doesn't have a correct construction but you can understand).

The correct way to say it would be:

...vamos a matar el tiempo en San Javier

go to waste time on San Javier?

This is an implicit question, i'm not so sure if in English have that form of sentence, out of sarcasm obviously.

But is like a question to throw it to everybody, maybe with an unpleasant/tired tone of voice.

or

...vamos a perder el tiempo yendo a San Javier

This form is a more standard way to say:

we're going to waste time in San Javier

But, the future time conjugation isn't so obvious, if you want to specify future time (even the tomorrow date) and an affirmation, you need to say:

... tomorrow we're going to waste time until San Javier

...Mañana iremos a perder el tiempo en San Javier

In Spanish, this sentences would be enough to imply the travel and the place itself or only the place itself, like you want to say it: they're not going to do anything of consequence until the San Javier event.

If you are too exquisite (Spanish: Sibarita, Exquisito, Tiquismiquis) and really need to specify only the travel and the place it self:

...Mañana perderemos el tiempo yendo a San Javier.


Additional thoughts taken from comment:

When i say "Yes" , is because un barbarismo it self doesn't implies an absolute wrong answer, let me explain on this way:

if i say: we need to wait on line instead of we need to wait in line; when my context is a queue of people, the firs sentences is a bararismo; is wrong but you can understand what's the message.

If you need to say this on an strict correct way, don't use tirar tiempo In the context of the original ask (... going to san javier...).

My Recommendation is to use:

Perder el Tiempo

if you wanna say literally WASTING TIME

and

Pasar el rato

if you wanna say FOOLING AROUND.

About your examples

the expresion "tirar tiempo" is very unusuall, let me show you from your citations:

7 Formas de tirar el tiempo cuando peleas por un objetivo

this sentences is about throwing time, however, the action itself is an event and no an expression like wasting time or fool around, on this case, tirar el tiempo is equivalent to expending time doing other stuffs; the word el between tirar and tiempo make time a subject of the verb throw giving the meaning of wasting. This cases are unusual (it depends of author's desires).

Si dormir más de 6 horas es tirar el tiempo yo firmaría ahora mismo por poder tirar tiempo a destajo.

this sentences is correct, not so perfect sintax but enough to be good (let show you where is wrong):

Si dormir más de 6 horas es tirar el tiempo yo firmaría ahora mismo por poder tirar tiempo a destajo.

Si dormir más de 6 horas es tirar el tiempo yo firmaría ahora mismo para poder tirar tiempo a destajo.

But be careful with this, the second part of the sentence (after the colon), is a regionalismo (expression or verbal forms from an specific place, this case; Spain)

La guía de Greenpeace o como tirar tiempo y dinero

Well constructed sentence, but , the use of tirar tiempo is equivalent to the literal meaning of trowing time, this is because the expression have a satiric intention. by other hand, the tirar tiempo expression is used in his malsonante form; like i said , the sentence have a satiric intention, also tirar applies to tiempo y dinero:

The Greenpeace Guide, or how throwing money and time.

To be clear, the expression it self tirar tiempo doesn't implies a barbarismo, the way you use, transform it.

Like on line and in line , both are correct, instead, new yorkers uses on line to refer a queue of people.

Look this poll:

https://6thfloor.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/06/is-it-on-line-or-in-line/

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  • OK, is this "barbarism" (what you call a "barbarian construction") likely just a matter of sloppy chat, of the kind you see in English all over the Internet? Or does it cast doubt on the speaker's nationality? – Robusto Jan 7 '18 at 22:54
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The existing answer is interesting -- I loved Tiquismiquis! But although the author starts out with "yes," in the middle I wasn't so sure:

the expression:

... mañana vamos a ir a tirar tiempo hasta San Javier

doesn't have a correct syntax, it sound like an obvious bad translation or a "barbarian construction" (Spanish: un Barbarismo, sentence who doesn't have a correct construction but you can understand).

The correct way to say it would be:

...vamos a matar el tiempo en San Javier

Therefore I'm writing a partial, supporting answer to make sure it's clear that "tirar tiempo" is apparently an acceptable expression/modismo. I wasn't familiar with it but google has shown me plenty of examples. Here are a couple:

  • 7 Formas de tirar el tiempo cuando peleas por un objetivo (fuente)

  • Si dormir más de 6 horas es tirar el tiempo yo firmaría ahora mismo por poder tirar tiempo a destajo. (fuente)

  • La guía de Greenpeace o como tirar tiempo y dinero (fuente)

(Interestingly, what these three examples have in common is a slightly sarcastic tone.)

Finally, if San Javier is an event, then sure, we can fill the time until the event starts, but if we're traveling to San Javier, then we'd be filling the time until we get there.

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