TreeHouse196
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¿Es correcto usar "@" para significar femenino/masculino?
Accepted answer
13 votes

La RAE dijo que no es correcto usar "@" para indicar los dos géneros de una palabra porque el símbolo no es una letra. Fuente: http://www.europapress.es/cultura/exposiciones-00131/noticia-rae-...

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What is the difference between "llover" and "lluvia"?
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7 votes

"Llover" is the verb "to rain". For example, Llueve mucho Means "it rains a lot". On the other hand, "la lluvia" is a noun which means "the rain". For example, No me gusta la lluvia Means "I ...

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Is it possible to refer to a wife as "una marida?"
7 votes

"Marida" as a noun does not exist in Spanish. The word "marido" is commonly used in pair with "mujer". If you want the male and female words to be of the same root, you can use "esposo/esposa". The ...

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Frases en español que usan palabras que empiezan todas sucesivamente por a, b, c, d, ... hasta la z
7 votes

Estas frases se llaman "abecegramas". Encontré un sitio de web acerca de estas frases: http://www.juegosdepalabras.com/abc/abecegrama.htm Un ejemplo (con ñ y w): Anoche brillaron cerca, dos ...

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¿Cuál es la diferencia entre "contar" y "decir"?
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6 votes

Se usa más el verbo decir. El verbo contar sólo se usa* cuando una persona le dice a alguien lo que pasó en una historia. Más ejemplos: Por favor, cuéntame la historia de La Cenicienta. Por favor, ...

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How important is correct usage of el/la in spoken Spanish?
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6 votes

Most people will understand what you are trying to say under most circumstances. However, gender is Spanish is important if fluency is your goal. Here are some reasons: Frequently using the wrong ...

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¿Cuál es la diferencia entre "suficiente" y "lo suficiente"?
5 votes

The word "lo" is the neutral definite article. It is used when you need to use the definite article to refer to an abstract concept that comes from an adjective. In essence, "lo suficiente" means "...

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Traducción de "hacer(le) caso"
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5 votes

La frase "hacer caso a alguien" tiene dos definiciónes principales según la RAE: Prestarle la atención que merece Obedecer, ser dócil Esta frase se traduce al inglés como "to pay attention"...

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How did the syntactical strucutre “me gusta” come to be in Spanish? It seems to be different from its Latin root and other Romance languages
5 votes

In Spanish it is possible, although uncommon, for the word "gustar" to have the same syntax as in Portuguese. Here is a passage from the Spanish Wiktionary article on gustar: Si se desea ...

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Distancia desde Chicago a Nueva York VS. Distancia entre Chicago y Nueva York
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4 votes

The word "desde", according to the RAE dictionary, is used to indicate the staring point of a spacial or temporal distance. The word "hasta" is used to indicate the ending point. In this context, the ...

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Selena Gomez's pronunciation
4 votes

Selena Gomez is not a native speaker of Spanish, and as far as I can tell she does not currently speak the language fluently. Because of this, her accent is not perfect, however it is decent. Her ...

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Describing "una persona" who's male—adjective agreement
4 votes

In Spanish, the adjective always agrees with the noun it describes. The noun "persona" is always feminine. Therefore, all adjective that describe it are feminine too, even if the overall phrase ("una ...

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How to use "gustar"?
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4 votes

The verb "gustar" is Spanish means "to be pleasing." We use the form "gustarse", which means to be pleasing to someone. There is no verb which literally means "to like" in Spanish. Instead of saying "...

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Exclamation Point
3 votes

Yes it is. However, as always, the exclamation point before must be inverted: ¡Bienvenidos!

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Use of the preposition ''de''
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3 votes

"Un poco" as an adjective is used to indicate a small amount of a noun which is not countable (for example, the noun "Spanish", as you cannot have 5 or 6 "Spanish"). Here is the entry in the RAE ...

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Difference between Spanish and Catalan
2 votes

Catalan, to me, is like an Italianized form of French. It shares many similarities with Spanish, likely due to its development on the Iberian Peninsula, but it is more similar to French. It is most ...

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What is the basic necessary grammar I would need to tackle for Spanish fluency?
1 votes

I am assuming you already know the basics such as word order, gender, number, etc. Note that Spanish word order is not as strict as that of English (e.g. sometimes the subject of a verb is at the end ...

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Why "preocupa" doesn't use "estoy"?
1 votes

To add some more grammar to DGaleano's answer, In your first example, the word "enfadado (angered)" is the past participle of "enfadar (to anger)". The past participle can be used to turn a verb into ...

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How do you say I have been waiting for you forever in Spanish?
1 votes

In this case, you will use the verb "haber" to mean "to have", combined the the past participle of a verb. To say "To be waiting", we can say "Estar esperando." So, "I have been waiting" is "He ...

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Exceptions of forming negative statements
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1 votes

In Spanish, we only use double negatives when the negative word comes after the verb. For example: When saying "nobody knows", we would say "No sabe nadie" or "Nadie sabe", but not "Nadie no sabe."

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Why "la clase turista" and "primera clase" in Spanish?
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1 votes

Adjectives that describe number, such as "primera", always come before the noun. Business class is referred to as "clase ejecutiva." Secondly, it is common to say "pasajeros de clase turista" ...

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