J. Calleja
  • Member for 10 years, 2 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
  • Donostia-San Sebastian, Spain
What would be a good way to express "You can't get something out of nothing"?
3 votes

En el Refranero del Instituto Cervantes se puede encontrar: De donde no hay no se puede sacar. Donde no hay, no hay.

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Word usage: "caminamos" VS "caminábamos"
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0 votes

Yes, you can use caminábamos to describe a continued action in the past or an unfinished action. The first translation is: Caminamos de tienda en tienda para comprar las flores más baratas y hermosas....

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Why isn't "good morning" "buenas mañanas"?
5 votes

In Spanish, you express your wishes for the remaining of the day. So, in the morning, you wish a good day. After noon (sometimes after lunch), you wish a good afternoon. Good night is said when the ...

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Usage of "millar" vs "millón"
1 votes

I think both mean the same: several thousands. I think miles is more used because it is shorter and it cannot be confused with millones.

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What does "lo" in "(no) lo es" refer to?
5 votes

I think this kind of sentence is called in Spanish "oración copulativa". Basically they are composed of: Subject Verb (normally, to be) Attribute Dinero is the subject and todo en la vida is the ...

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Can "los cristales" be translated as "mirrors" or "looking glasses"?
Accepted answer
6 votes

Here, I would understand cristal as a crystal made surface that give poorer reflections than a mirror. Think when you look through a window and see your reflection on the glass. I do not dare to give ...

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How to translate "make it count"
9 votes

Hacerlo contar does not make sense. Haz que cuente (imperative) is a better translation but I think it is still too literal. In this case, I would use: Aprovéchala Some other phrases that you ...

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The letter "k" in Spanish
5 votes

Most of the words containing a k come from foreign languages. For example: Ketchup Kiwi There are, obviously some words that are names of people or places: Kenia Kansas There are also words that ...

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Usage of "adiós" in the Basque country
Accepted answer
4 votes

I don't think it has negative connotations, although it is true that we're not in the habit of saying it. Normally, we use the word agur. It is also more usual to say hasta luego (see you later) than ...

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Determining gender of words ending in "e"
6 votes

I think most words ending in -e are femenine. For example: La clase La torre La gente La sangre However, there are a lot more exceptions for words ending in -e than for words ending in -o. For ...

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What's the correct way to say printed?
4 votes

Both are correct although the irregular form is more common.

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Translating "to be excited to..."
1 votes

I think emocionado is a internal feeling: Estoy emocionado, no tengo palabras (I can't talk). Entusiasmado is a feeling that you can't help but show: Estoy entusiasmado, no puedo dejar de sonreir ( ...

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How important are accents in written Spanish?
8 votes

Although it is possible to understand a text without accents, it would hurt your eyes. In addition to this, some words change their meaning if you miss one accent (más/mas, él/el, té/te...).

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Origin of contigo and similar "contractions"
6 votes

They are not contractions because there is not a "long form" to say the same. Conti and conmi do not exist. They come from latin: cum: with mecum: with me tecum: with you Amigo and enemigo come ...

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