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I would’ve expected Joe calls me to be ”Joe me llama” Exactly. "llamo" is the first person form of the verb. I'm a learner just like you, so I can't tell whether “Joe me llamo” is a grammatically wrong version of "me llamo Joe" or just a very rare word order used for a very specific form of emphasis, but it does not mean ”Joe calls me”. ...


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There are 3 rules that changes the verb root in the preterite form: The -car, -gar, -zar rule Triple vowel rule Pancake rule The -car, -gar, -zar Rule (YO FORM ONLY) So this rule is pretty straight forward. If a verb ends in -car, -gar, or -zar (in the infinitive) then you drop the -car, -gar, or zar. After you drop it, you add -gué, -qué, or -cé (...


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Apart from the abbreviations that extract raises some other questions which it might be helpful to point you to. As already mentioned fam=familiar and for=formal. This distinction between forms of you which we do not have in English has its own tag on this site ustedeo and you might like to browse some of them to see the finer points of usage. In some ...


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These weird abbreviations are common in spanish grammar books. Many of them have a list, but I couldn't find one in the Practice Makes Perfect series. I can tell you what the abbreviations are from your post. You(fam.) means you(informal). This is basically talking about informal conversations. These include talking to a friend or relative. You(for.) ...


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You only use reflexive pronouns when the object is the same as the subject. EX: -She cut herself (Ella se cortó) The sentence you brought up, "Os encontrasteis a Raquel en el concierto" probably doesn't need a reflexive pronoun. I think using an indirect object pronoun would be more fitting. If you wanted to say, Raquel was found (by them) at / in ...


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Lo he escuchado mucho mi natal estado de Veracruz, en México: "Ves a decirle", "Ves rápido a la tienda a traerme esto", "Córrele, ves a verlo (al señor).


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¿Los gatos negros son de mala suerte? (de por sí) ¿Los gatos negros te traen mala suerte? (a ti) ¿Los gatos negros les traen mala suerte? (a ustedes) ¿Les parece que los gatos negros sean/son de mala suerte? (a ustedes)


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In verb phrases formed by a main verb and an infinitive and/or a verb ending in -ando/-endo (present participle), only the main verb is tensed and conjugated. The only case I can think of where a conjugated verb can be followed by another conjugated verb is that of both verbs referring to different grammatical persons, with the second verb belonging to a ...


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The verb "encontrar" can be pronominal. When you use "encontrarse", the pronoun does not have a reflexive value but is called a dative. In this case the dative expresses the interest or involvement of the subject but is not reflexive. "Encontrarse" is obligatory with the preposition "con" but optional with the ...


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