7 votes
Accepted

Names of winds in Spain

Here you have the most common (and also some uncommon) winds in Spain, according to the direction they blow from, taken from the Spanish Wikipedia, the Eolonimia page and other sources (entries ...
user avatar
  • 76.8k
6 votes

¿Qué se pela cuando hace "un frío que pela"?

Buscando información para otra expresión referente al verbo pelar, resulta que he encontrado que la expresión hacer un frío que pela es como unos 100 años más antigua que el ejemplo del siglo XVIII ...
user avatar
  • 76.8k
5 votes
Accepted

'Estar' and 'hacer' with weather

Notice that "hacer" is used with nouns: hace sol, hace viento, hace frío... while "estar" is used with verbs in -ing form está lloviendo, está nevando, está granizando or you can even say "...
user avatar
  • 4,612
5 votes
Accepted

¿Hay que decir "Hubo sol ayer" o "Hay sol ayer"?

En español se usa el verbo hacer con los fenómenos atmosféricos que no tienen verbo propio: hacer sol, hacer viento, hacer frío y otros (en contraposición a llover, nevar y otros). Luego la expresión ...
user avatar
  • 76.8k
3 votes

If asked, "¿Qué tiempo hace?" can you reply with just "Hace mal / buen"?

As a native speaker from Spain, the sentence "hace buen/mal" does not seem idiomatic to me. The DLE marks buen and mal as apócopes (shortenings) of bueno and malo respectively but also ...
user avatar
  • 7,126
3 votes
Accepted

¿Es correcto decir "hay mucho viento afuera"?

Según parece, tanto "hay viento" como "hace viento" son correctas. Por mi parte, no encuentro nada raro en las construcciones con haber, que de hecho me resultan un poco más naturales que con hacer. ...
user avatar
  • 39k
3 votes

Is there an equivalent idiom for 'raining cats and dogs'?

Besides the examples given above, two observations: Caer chuzos de punta There seems to be a common theme of things falling from the sky point first (de punta) as a simile for heavy rain. In Spain ...
user avatar
  • 39k
1 vote

Is there an equivalent idiom for 'raining cats and dogs'?

Good answers here already, but I'd like to add another way to talk about a downpour: aguacero -- which is an extremely heavy downpour Examples: Me agarró un aguacero | I got caught in a tremendous ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
1 vote

Is there an equivalent idiom for 'raining cats and dogs'?

It will be better if you use expressions like "está lloviendo a cántaros", or "está diluviando", since those are more common expressions than "llover a más y mejor" or "caer chuzos de punta" or "...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible