7

Here you have the most common (and also some uncommon) winds in Spain, according to the direction they blow from, taken from the Spanish Wikipedia, the Eolonimia page and other sources (entries restricted to those appearing in the DLE): North Tramontana. From transmontano, Latin transmontānus, "coming from the other side of the mountains". Terral. From ...


6

Buscando información para otra expresión referente al verbo pelar, resulta que he encontrado que la expresión hacer un frío que pela es como unos 100 años más antigua que el ejemplo del siglo XVIII que puse en la pregunta, solo que se usaba de otra forma: Ayer mañana, día de la Candelaria, amaneció Madrid con una nieve de media vara, y hace un frío que se ...


5

Notice that "hacer" is used with nouns: hace sol, hace viento, hace frío... while "estar" is used with verbs in -ing form está lloviendo, está nevando, está granizando or you can even say "está haciendo sol". You use "estar" with verbs and "hacer" with nouns. "Está lloviendo" does mean "it is raining". The -ndo form is like -ing, it means action ...


5

En español se usa el verbo hacer con los fenómenos atmosféricos que no tienen verbo propio: hacer sol, hacer viento, hacer frío y otros (en contraposición a llover, nevar y otros). Luego la expresión que buscas es: Ayer hizo sol.


3

As a native speaker from Spain, the sentence "hace buen/mal" does not seem idiomatic to me. The DLE marks buen and mal as apócopes (shortenings) of bueno and malo respectively but also stands that they are used before a single masculine sustantive. You have omitted such sustantive in your sentence. I would use Hace bueno/malo or Hace buen/mal ...


3

Según parece, tanto "hay viento" como "hace viento" son correctas. Por mi parte, no encuentro nada raro en las construcciones con haber, que de hecho me resultan un poco más naturales que con hacer. Sospecho que hay diferencias que tienen que ver con el uso de viento o lluvia como condiciones meteorológicas (a la par de frío o calor) o bien como eventos ...


3

Besides the examples given above, two observations: Caer chuzos de punta There seems to be a common theme of things falling from the sky point first (de punta) as a simile for heavy rain. In Spain the word chuzo is found, which the meaning of "stick with a metallic point". In Argentina the same word can be used with this pattern, though it's not so common ...


1

Good answers here already, but I'd like to add another way to talk about a downpour: aguacero -- which is an extremely heavy downpour Examples: Me agarró un aguacero | I got caught in a tremendous downpour Está cayendo un aguacero | It's raining cats and dogs


1

It will be better if you use expressions like "está lloviendo a cántaros", or "está diluviando", since those are more common expressions than "llover a más y mejor" or "caer chuzos de punta" or "llueve a mares". In fact, if you say something like that in Argentina, you will look like a crazy dude, and with the "chuzo" expression... well, the word doesn't ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible