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20

In Spain is not usual to use "Welcome back!", at least I do not use it. In my experience, I have a friend who had gone to Scotland to live four months ago, last week he arrived to Spain and all of us said "¡Bienvenido!". If I translate "Welcome back!" I would say "¡Bienvenido de nuevo!" interpreting more than translating it, or "¡Bienvenido otra vez!". I ...


14

In English we say: No Problem It was nothing Don't mention it Don't worry about it All as very casual responses to "Thank you" In Spanish I would use "de nada" in the same environment. With friends / family, etc.. If I were entering a classy restaurant and held the door for someone who responded with "muchos Gracias" then I ...


14

The short answer would be Que tengas un buen día Which express your desire for the other person to actually "have a nice day". "Ten un buen día" is the literal translation but it doesn't express the sentiment behind "have a nice day". It could be used to maybe cheer someone up; something like "Hey you, go and have a nice day" or something like that. "...


13

In a somewhat formal context like that, the right expression would be Me alegro de volver a verle.


12

There are different ways to express the same salutation in spanish: ¡Qué bueno verte (de nuevo)! ¡Qué gusto verte (de nuevo)! ¡Me alegro de verte (de nuevo)! ¡Me alegro de (volver a) verte!


12

American English is famous for responding to thanks with an acknowledgment that something indeed was done: "You're welcome" (yes, I did you a favor, and I accept your thanks). Virtually all other European language respond to thanks with a denial that anything significant was done: "de nada," "It was nothing," "de rien," "det var ingenting," etc. "You're ...


10

As you indicate in the question Encantado de conocerte / conocerle may be the best option. If it is a formal context I would favor the "usted" form. Other forms would be Mucho gusto en conocerle / Encantado de conocerle which is sometimes shortened as Mucho gusto or Encantado Which makes also valid (Es) Un placer (Es un placer ...


10

Por dejar aquí constancia de lo que opinaba la RAE en el siglo XVIII (Diccionario de Autoridades): HOLA. interj. Modo vulgar de hablar usado para llamar a otro que es inferior. Latín Heus, que es de donde viene. Resulta curioso que por entonces se considerara una forma vulgar de saludar, por lo que podría ser utilizado hasta como insulto contra la persona ...


9

I would say: ¡Bienvenido! or ¡Bienvenido de vuelta! "¡Bienvenido de regreso!" is fine too, I don't know why but I prefer to use "vuelta" instead of "regreso".


7

Se ríen porque es gracioso. Si quieres evitarlo, otra manera de presentarte sería: — Me llamo Fénix. — ¿Felix? — No, Fénix. Con ene.


7

"Querida Carmen" is perfectly acceptable for non-love-related relations like the one you are describing. It's more like "Dear Carmen" than "My beloved Carmen". I would not use exclamation marks (EDITED from wrong "admiration marks") to emphasize the salutation. If you still use them, please use both the opening and the closing ones. (¡Querida Carmen!) ...


7

First of all, the expression is not specific of Puerto Rico. It is widely used in most (if not all) Spanish speaking countries. As to why it is used so frequently, once again it is not specific of this expression. It is a cultural feature. In Spanish speaking countries it is more usual to greet strangers than in other countries. If I meet someone in the ...


7

"Hola" parece venir de voces expresivas para infundir aliento o apresurar el paso, al igual que la palabra "hala" o la voz francesa holá y el hallo inglés. De acuerdo a Wikipedia: Según el DRAE la palabra hola es una voz expresiva que podría estar relacionada con el inglés hello y el alemán hallo.​ Corominas la considera también una voz ...


7

Lo correcto es muchas gracias. En español, el adjetivo debe concordar en género y número con el sustantivo. Como gracias es femenino plural, el adjetivo (en este caso, muchas) también debe estar en femenino plural.


7

This appears to be a colloquial idiom meaning "What happened?" or "What's up?". In a couple of forum questions people mention it's rather common in Mexico and Venezuela. To me (from media exposure to Mexican Spanish) it sounds distinctly like something a Mexican would say. It's so common there, it seems, that it's often spelled as one word, quihúbole (if you ...


6

You could certainly use equipo RocketNutsCorp But it would sound to me like you are one of many teams in a competition (Hackathon or the like) If you say El equipo de RocketNutsCorp Then it conveys "all the workers from RocketNutsCorp company" Additionally, if it fits the nature of "RocketNutsCorp" you could name the department El ...


6

Significa ¿cómo estás?. Es una manera de saludar utilizada popularmente en México, sería más como "quiubole" y su traducción literal sería "Qué hubo". Y tienes muchas razón al argumentar que se escucha en numerosas películas, bien sean mexicanas o no, por ejemplo, si te pones a ver Ad Astra: Hacia Las Estrellas te darás cuenta que el doblaje hacia el ...


6

To kiss [someone's] cheek in Spanish is besar [a alguien] en la mejilla Among many other meanings, the pronoun se can be used to express reciprocity, so "to kiss each other's cheek" would be "besarse en la mejilla" (or "besarse el uno al otro en la mejilla", if the shorter version isn't clear enough, although most people can't kiss their own cheeks ...


6

I would say something like se dieron dos besos - the location of the kisses is understood in most of the contexts -. I am going to give you something to read: Es llegar a cualquier sitio y, para saludar, dos besos en la mejilla. Muac, muac. Siempre igual y con el mismo resultado: impactos de mejilla o de labios en la mejilla, restos de saliva o ...


5

La gente ríe porque simplemente le causa gracia. No es una ofensa, tomatelo con humor :) People laugh simply because they find it funny. It's not an offense, take it with humor :)


5

En mi opinión, puede sonar algo gracioso, el hecho de decir la frase en un estilo que tiene un tono teatral. Quizás probando una sutil diferencia, como Mi nombre es Fénix, como el ave, o haciendo notar que ya sabes que no es común Mi nombre es Fénix, sí, como el ave. De todos modos me parece bueno que como primera impresión la gente siempre sonría.


5

In Spanish, the term "de nada" means "[something] of little importance or value". The expression "cosa de nada" has been used for centuries: —Bien puede vuestra merced, señor, concederle el don que pide, que no es cosa de nada: solo es matar a un gigantazo, y esta que lo pide es la alta princesa Micomicona, reina del gran reino Micomicón de Etiopia. ...


5

1. Origin of buenas noches Buenas noches is a contraction of the older Spanish salutations: Id a buenas noches Dios os dé buenas noches This can be seen in the earliest recorded uses of the phrase: Amigos, id a buenas noches & dormid y folgad fasta mañana... Libro del cavallero Cifar (1300-1305) E ora idvos a buenas noches... ...


5

You can reply with the usual forms hola buenos días, etc... Even if the speaker seems to be trying to reach a broad audience, you don't need to go with anything special, like "saludos a ti también" or another "saludos a todos". Imagine yourself in a room with other people, when some else joins the group and says saludos a todos (like a teacher who enters ...


5

In general, "mamá" is perfectly acceptable and the most common (I would say). However, "amá" or "ma" are very common among Mexicans as well, so nothing wrong with them either. If I had to choose one of them, I would use "mamá".


5

This question is really interesting to me. You are not saying anything about the father (if there is one) and that factor could influence too how the boy speaks. I don't know Mexican culture well enough to be sure what the boy would say if both parents were Mexican, but it is interesting to me how people in the States say "My dad/mom ...". Never "My father/...


5

Que tenga buen día. or the more familiar, but less commonly heard: Que tengas buen día. Are both very common in Mexico and Guatemala (the countries with which I am most familiar). Even more common, especially as a closing of a business transaction (a store clerk would say it to you as you're finishing paying): Que te vaya bien.


5

I think it would be good to complete this for other possible readers. Very formal, usually only used in cases where the email/letter will (or can) be used legally or to customers, providers, etc: ... Sin otro particular, atentamente, Name/company Same case when you expect a response: ... Sin otro particular y a la espera de sus ...


5

Well, to begin it should be made clear that, while adiós indeed comes from the phrase a Dios os encomiendo (I entrust you to God), like the phrase ojalá (from لو شاء الله meaning if God wills (it)), today it no longer is seen to have any religious significance. My atheist friends who are very particular about language1 have no problem using it. In that ...


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