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7 votes
Accepted

Estás versus Eres: meanings in "you are a noun + adjective"

The distinction is that the first sentence grammatically says "at this moment you are a naughty girl" This is incorrect. What you mean happens in this example: you see the girl all "...
Diego's user avatar
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4 votes
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When do you use the present progressive and the simple present for continuous actions?

For things which are in progress and can take a while (like eating), we use the progressive, mostly as in English. In general you cannot substitute the simple present in this context. You can get away ...
pablodf76's user avatar
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3 votes
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"Quizá puede" vs "quizá pueda": presente indicativo vs presente subjuntivo

Esta duda la resuelven los párrafos 25.14i y siguientes de la Nueva gramática de la lengua española, el cual cito a continuación: Los adverbios de duda y de posibilidad son compatibles con los dos ...
Charlie's user avatar
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3 votes
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Supongamos que + alguien + muere/muera(Indicativo/Subjuntivo)

Según E. Ridruejo (Gramática descriptiva de la lengua española, §49.4.4), suponer como “verbo creador de mundos” permite la alternancia entre subjuntivo e indicativo en las oraciones subordinadas a él,...
pablodf76's user avatar
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3 votes

Using the present indicative to communicate about the future

In this publication you can find some good examples of the present tense being used to express future time in Spanish: El presente prospectivo o presente con valor de futuro alude a hechos ...
Gustavson's user avatar
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3 votes
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Conjugation of dar with the pronoun vos

The conjugation of dar with vos is in fact regular: present indicative: (vos) das present subjunctive: (vos) des imperative: (vos) da It's only because the root of dar is nonsyllabic (a mere d-) ...
pablodf76's user avatar
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3 votes
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"Trabajar" versus "trabajamos": when to use the infinitive

In English it's not so noticeable, but the fact is that even in English, you conjugate one verb and leave one verb as an infinitive. To convince you of this, consider this sentence: She wants to ...
aparente001's user avatar
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2 votes

"Trabajar" versus "trabajamos": when to use the infinitive

In your second example we have a perífrasis verbal. According to the DRAE perífrasis verbal f. Gram. Unidad predicativa constituida generalmente por un verbo auxiliar en forma personal y un verbo ...
RubioRic's user avatar
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2 votes

Why is the subjunctive mood used in this sentence rather than indicative?

It's influential. That's why. Mothers-in-law are amicable with the son-in-law, even though he doesn't thank them for their help. Also, the event of "thanking" hasn't even happened. If ...
dockeryZ's user avatar
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2 votes

"Quizá puede" vs "quizá pueda": presente indicativo vs presente subjuntivo

El adverbio quizá expresa duda o probabilidad; por tanto, la elección del subjuntivo es adecuada para mantener esta consistencia. No obstante, las formas —Quizá esto puede / pueda [...] se usan ...
Schwale's user avatar
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1 vote

Why do verbs derived from tener have "ten" in their tú imperative form, yet verbs derived from decir use "dice" rather than "di" in the imperative?

This might look odd when viewing the imperative in isolation, but there is something of a sliding scale of maintaining consistency with decir and regularising conjugations across a number of tenses, ...
jacobo's user avatar
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1 vote

When do you use the present progressive and the simple present for continuous actions?

My spouse is German and has a tendency to get these two tenses reversed rather often when speaking English. This has given me reason to think a fair amount about these two tenses. In English, the ...
aparente001's user avatar
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1 vote

When do you use the present progressive and the simple present for continuous actions?

The use of these tenses is very similar to that in English, I think (my native language is Spanish). "Comemos" means "We eat". "Estamos comiendo" means "We are eating". The second form emphasizes ...
Pablo De Napoli's user avatar

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