Hot answers tagged

35

Gender is a grammatical feature that was present in Proto-Indo-European, that is, the common ancestor of a diverse group of languages including both English and Spanish, as well as Greek and Hindi. The development of that is an interesting read. Both Anglo-Saxon and Latin (the languages from which English and Spanish derive) had a three way gender ...


32

In all the Romance languages, gestapo is feminine despite its ending. It is most likely that whichever language first imported it (probably either French or Italian) figured that because gestapo stands in for Geheime Staatspolizei (policía estatal secreta), the appropriate use would be to make it feminine as with the analogous words la police (FR), la ...


26

Well, your teachers might get upset if I tell you this but: it's a lie, you will be understood. I guess they say it to encourage you to correct your mistakes. You should correct them anyways. I trust you will try to speak correctly anyways, so I'm telling you the truth. I don't want you to be so worried and stressed to avoid mistakes. Just try to fix them. ...


23

(English version; loose Spanish translation follows) Latin mens, mentis produced ablative mente This practice began all the way back in Classical Latin, passed into Vulgar Latin and Proto-Romance and thence to all modern Western Romance tongues: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, French, and the many related neighboring languages in that group. ...


19

The Diccionario panhispánico de dudas tells us: azúcar 1. ‘Sustancia cristalizada usada para endulzar’. Es válido su uso en ambos géneros, aunque, si va sin especificativo, es mayoritario su empleo en masculino: «Mientras revolvíamos el azúcar, Alfonso tomó la palabra» (Ibargüengoitia Crímenes [Méx. 1979]); «Se trató sin éxito de facilitar la inmigración de ...


17

Actually it's not a gender reversal but a tradition that survives (inherited from Latin). The complete rules are intrincate and arbitrary, kind of "well that sounds good to me", full of exceptions and even exceptions to the exceptions (see the variable use with toponyms or the "árbitra" or "árabe" cases). It is used with common names ("El ágata es una ...


14

Colors in Spanish usually work as nouns, besides being adjectives. Color nouns are always masculine: el blanco, el negro, el azul, el rojo; even color nouns derived from feminine nouns are masculine: el naranja, el violeta. This is probably because the noun forms are understood as referring implicitly to the word color, which is masculine (el naranja = el ...


13

La RAE dijo que no es correcto usar "@" para indicar los dos géneros de una palabra porque el símbolo no es una letra. Fuente: http://www.europapress.es/cultura/exposiciones-00131/noticia-rae-recuerda-no-correcto-utilizar-incluir-masculino-femenino-no-letra-20131212182810.html


13

Es una aplicación (en femenino). La definición y la explicación vienen de hace años, cuando aún no existía el boom que ha sufrido el mundo de la telefonía y del desarrollo web y de aplicaciones. Según el Diccionario de la Real Academia Española (DRAE): Aplicación Del lat. applicatio, -ōnis. f. Acción y efecto de aplicar o aplicarse. f. ...


13

El agua lleva el porque, a pesar de que agua es palabra femenina (decimos que está fría), la primera sílaba es tónica y el primer fonema es /a/. Si colocamos un adjetivo entre el artículo y el sustantivo, vuelve a ser la: la cristalina agua (pero el agua cristalina). El arroz tiene el porque es masculino. Para que aparezca obligatoriamente la aloforma ...


12

As Trevor says, there's a general rule that states that nouns: ending in a are feminine ending in o are masculine However, there are exceptions, and as usual with languages, those exceptions often happen in very common words, e.g. "mano" which ends in "o" but is feminine. Then you have words with different endings (in other vowels, in consonants...) ...


12

Indeed. What's happening is there's an omited word(s). For example, if I'm describing the room, I can use any of the following: Mi habitación es la grande. Mi habitación es la del fondo. Mi habitación es la que tiene mi maleta. Returning to your phrase: Mi habitación es la habitación número cinco. número X is itself a "short" hand for ordinal numbers (...


12

You could say tío paterno or tío materno Which is exactly what we do in English.. My paternal grandfather's name is James.


12

Lo que pasa es que el masculino es el caso no marcado, y el femenino es el marcado (singular y plural función casi de igual forma), pero obviamente eso no ayuda en Internet. Hay textos que se han escrito en castellano en que se desconocen por completo si alguien es hombre o mujer (ahora no caigo en el nombre, pero recuerdo haber leído uno en una clase de ...


12

Is it because it is associated with policía? The answer is yes according to the DPD (Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas): sigla. 1. Se llama sigla tanto a la palabra formada por las iniciales de los términos que integran una denominación compleja, como a cada una de esas letras iniciales. Las siglas se utilizan para referirse de forma abreviada a ...


12

Check ¿Por qué el género masculino suele dominar a la hora de referirse a colectivos? Feminine is the "exclusive" gender, while masculine is the "inclusive". From RAE's guidelines El uso genérico del masculino se basa en su condición de término no marcado en la oposición masculino/femenino. Por ello, es incorrecto emplear el femenino ...


11

We use "fruta" to refer to some of the juicy fruits of some trees, but "fruto" to refer to the product of something. La pera es el fruto del peral. You can use "fruto" in another contexts like Este es el fruto de mi esfuerzo "Frutos secos" is used to define the product of some trees/plants that in their natural state don't have (much) water, like ...


11

Pediatra, taxista, turista and policía are not feminine but common gender: they are invariable and can function either as masculine or feminine; this will be manifest by the form of the articles, adjectives, etc. that agree with them. What you surely meant to ask was why those words have the ending -a which commonly marks feminine gender. In fact it has ...


11

La RAE (por exactamente esas razones) considera el uso femenino justificado, aunque nota que hay precedente para su uso masculino mayoritario: COVID-19 La Organización Mundial de la Salud ha propuesto la abreviación COVID-19 (a partir de COronaVIrus + Disease ‘enfermedad’ + [20]19). El acrónimo COVID-19 que nombra la enfermedad causada por el SARS-CoV-2 se ...


10

Your derivations (pan -> empanar -> empanada ; pared -> emparedar -> emparedado ) are right. There is nothing odd with the gender, though. In the sequence 1. pared (substantive; feminine ) 2. emparedar (verb ; no gender) 3. emparedado/a (participle, works as an adjective; which can in turn be substantivized) the original gender (la ...


10

Your answer can be found in section 3.2 on the Diccionario panhispánico de dudas. Below is a translation of the original text: 3.2. One adjective postposed to several nouns. When one adjective qualifies two or more coordinated nouns and is postposed to them, it is advisable to inflect it in plural and masculine if the two adjectives are of different ...


10

Trátase en este caso de un adverbio, porque demasiado modifica común y no tú. Cuando demasiado es adverbio, es invariable y termina en -o, así que podemos decir que aquella persona debió decir «y tú demasiado común»


10

Según la NGLE (37.1i-37.1k), los atributos de los verbos copulativos como parecer se sustituyen por el pronombre neutro lo independientemente de su género y número.


10

Note that many streets are named after people. Sometimes names coincide with adjectives. For example, you might have the Calle de Javier Rojo Gutiérrez. Over time, people call it Calle Javier Rojo Gutiérrez by juxtaposition, and eventually Calle Rojo Gutiérrez removing the first name, and then just Calle Rojo by getting rid of the second last name. But ...


9

If you start with a female one, you start with muchas. If you start with a male one, you start with muchos. In your example we have Tiene muchas playas, montañas, tiendas y restaurantes. Since restaurante is a male word, it doesn't change the sense of the sentence. We can do an inversion like: Tiene muchos restaurantes, playas, montañas, y tiendas. ...


9

Además de la recomendación de la RAE, permitidme añadir unos argumentos por los que yo personalmente estoy en contra de este uso de @: No aporta nada, pues ya existe en castellano una forma para incluir a ambos géneros: en este caso, bienvenidos. Dificulta la lectura, levemente para los que no están acostumbrados a su uso, y gravemente para ciertas ...


9

There are words that have masculine and feminine but there are others that don't. Even in English you have horse and mare (caballo yegua), bull and cow (toro vaca), husband and wife (marido y mujer / esposo y esposa) For the feminine of "marido" we use among others: cónyuge, mujer, señora, compañera, consorte, esposa, pareja, costilla, media naranja (the ...


9

You have the answer in both the entry of the RAE and the answer to a very recent question about the order of modifiers in Spanish. First, fiero can be an adjective. See meanings starting with "adj." As an adjective, the position of the word will be generally after a noun, so the matches of "los fieros" will always be followed by a noun, and will not be all ...


9

En el caso de los nombres propios, son los usuarios del lenguaje los que le confieren a la palabra un género, por así decirlo. En este caso, dado que "PlayStation" hace referencia a una consola de videojuegos, se suele usar "la PlayStation" omitiendo la palabra "consola". Así lo podemos ver en ejemplos extraídos del CREA: Toshiba y Sony ya han cooperado ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible