18 votes
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Difference between 'mirar' and 'ver'

Just imagine that you were looking one of those "spot the 7 differences" pictures. You could say Miré las dos imágenes por mucho tiempo, pero no vi las diferencias I looked at both images for a ...
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16 votes
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Difference between "coche" and "carro"

In Spain we favor coche for a car, while a carro is more like a four wheeled cart (similar to the word carreta, which is a smaller, two wheeled cart), the one that would use horses or mules to pull it....
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12 votes
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What is the difference between "cerebro" and "seso"?

The difference in meaning is strictly as you've found: cerebro is the organ and seso is the tissue it's made of. But then you have figurative meanings and things get complicated fast. Cerebro is ...
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11 votes
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Plata or Dinero

Plata, which literally means "silver", is also one of the most common ways to refer to money (in any form) in American dialects of Spanish. As in English, there are many other ways to call money or ...
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11 votes
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What is the difference between "mobiliario" and "mueble(s)"?

Mobiliario is a collective noun; it corresponds well with English "furniture". Mueble is a countable noun; it means "piece of furniture". Therefore you can say either Vamos a comprar muebles nuevos. ...
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10 votes
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What is the difference among 'dormitorio', 'recámara', 'alcoba' and 'habitación'?

In Mexico... all 4 words are used for bedroom: Recámara also means chamber (the part of a pistol) Alcoba as @rodrigo says, is only used in books, novels and so on, although in some places (like ...
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What is the difference among 'dormitorio', 'recámara', 'alcoba' and 'habitación'?

I'm from Northern Spain. Here the most common word is habitación: ¡Vete a tu habitación! Go to your bedroom! However, in books and on TV, cuarto is probably more often seen and heard: ¡Vete a tu ...
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9 votes
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What is the difference (if any) between "comenzar" and "empezar"?

There is no difference whatsoever in meaning or grammar between empezar and comenzar. They are totally interchangeable. If you look around for more data on this, you'll find that this very same ...
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8 votes
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Difference between "luego" and "entonces"

Luego is generally quite specific to time and in isolation might be most accurately translated as later on. In some countries, it can also substitute for después: luego de hacer algo Entonces has a ...
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8 votes

Difference between "coche" and "carro"

If you come to Chile, you will notice that these words have very specific uses: Coche: the one used for carry babies. Carro: which is used to buy in the supermarket (or Internet). Both words can be ...
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7 votes
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¿Cuál es la diferencia entre chupetear y chupar?

Chupetear es una derivación iterativa (o frecuentativa) de chupar. Es decir que marca una acción repetida. El sufijo -ear tiene ese significado, entre muchos otros (suele aparecer como -tear o -quear)....
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7 votes
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What's the difference between "lejos" and "alejados"?

"lejos" is an invariable adverb. "alejado" is an adjective whose gender and number varies according to the noun to which it refers. Both tend to appear within the predicate, after verbs like "estar",...
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7 votes
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"No tiene por qué pagar" vs "No tiene que pagar"

La diferencia es sutil pero "no tiene que pagar" significa, "está libre de la responsabilidad (de pagar)". Por ejemplo: Si usted es menor de 12 años o mayor de 65 no tiene que pagar esta ...
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7 votes
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Is there a difference between 'detenerse' vs 'pararse'?

They have the same meaning. In fact, the DLE defines "detenerse" as: prnl. Pararse, cesar en el movimiento o en la acción. However, "detenerse" is more formal. In spoken Spanish, "pararse" ...
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7 votes

What is the difference among 'estante' vs 'repisa' vs 'balda'?

According to the DRAE: estante 5. m. Cada una de las tablas dispuestas horizontalmente en un mueble o en la pared para colocar objetos sobre ellas. repisa 2. f. Estante o placa de madera, cristal u ...
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7 votes

"Último" vs. "final"

The word último in its first meaning according to the dictionary is Que está al final de una línea, de una serie o de una sucesión. This means "something that is at the end of a line, series or ...
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7 votes
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Diferencia entre caridad y generosidad

Por razones históricas es esperable que encuentres que la diferencia entre “caridad” y “generosidad” es explicada con referencias a la religión cristiana. La palabra caridad tiene un par de ...
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6 votes
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What's the difference between "agradezco" and "gracias"?

As you say, "agradecer" is a verb, whereas "gracias" is just a noun used as an idiom itself. You use "gracias" in the same way you use "thank you". On the other hand, "Le agradezco que..." means ...
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6 votes
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Difference between "adiós" and "chau"?

Traditionally, adiós is used for someone leaving for an extended period of time or with no expectation of seeing them again. Chau is informal, and would virtually always imply you'd be expecting to ...
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6 votes

Difference between 'mirar' and 'ver'

"Ver" means "to see," but "mirar" means "to look at." Se mira para ver. One looks in order to see.
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6 votes

Difference between 'demás' and 'otros'?

Supplementary answer to add to what @Gustavson wrote: You can think of demás as the remaining ones, the remainder, or the rest. Let's take your example first: ¡Pero los demás huéspedes son muy ...
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6 votes

What is the difference between "mobiliario" and "mueble(s)"?

Practically there is no difference for a native speaker between those terms. Taking into account that you employ the plural in muebles. Mobiliario sounds a bit more formal and it tends to be used to ...
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  • 7,126
6 votes

Diferencia entre caridad y generosidad

Las connotaciones que han adquirido las dos palabras debido a su uso están muy bien explicadas en la respuesta de pablodf76. Esta respuesta se concentra en la diferencia puramente léxica. El DLE ...
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6 votes
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Diferencias de uso entre los adjetivos "corporal" y "corpóreo"

A mi entender, la sutil diferencia entre "corpóreo" y "corporal" puede deducirse más fácilmente a través de sus combinaciones léxicas. Mientras "corpóreo" se contrapone a ...
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6 votes
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ir de compras vs ir a hacer compras

The meaning is the same as far as I can tell, but in actual usage I've only ever encountered “(me) voy de compras”. This is my personal experience, though. There's a difference between “voy de compras”...
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6 votes
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borrador vs boceto

Dados los extractos que incluyes parece claro que ambas palabras son sinónimas, pero yo personalmente empleo más boceto cuando está relacionado con un dibujo o pintura y borrador cuando se trata de un ...
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  • 7,126
6 votes

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre "haber que" y "tener que"?

"Haber que" es una forma impersonal. Solo se conjuga en tercera persona del singular ("hay que", "había que", "habrá que"), y no tiene sujeto: no se puede decir ...
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5 votes

Plata or Dinero

According to the entry in the dictionary of the Royal Academy for plata_ f. Am. Dinero o riqueza. No tengo plata para comprar. So they classify it is an American usage. I assume from web ...
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5 votes
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¿Qué diferencia hay entre "colectivos" y "metrobuses" en Argentina?

En Argentina son tecnológicamente iguales, sólo diferentes en la circulación —preconfigurada especialmente en una red de carriles urbanos para el caso de los metrobuses. Colectivo es la ...
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5 votes

"Último" vs. "final"

Well, your question is a bit tricky because último and final can be synonymous. According to the DRAE último adj. Final, definitivo. In our calendars, saturday is not the last day of the ...
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