23 votes

What's that funny "illo" I keep hearing in Southern Spain?

Indeed, if you came to live to Southern Spain (the Andalusian region), probably you'll be hearing that word a lot, depending on the city you are living in. You may hear it more often in Sevilla, but ...
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  • 76.3k
11 votes
Accepted

Does "parientes" ever mean "parents," or is it always "relatives"?

Parientes always means relatives, never parents. I'm not very sure why your friends said that.
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  • 3,275
11 votes

Spanish for "spoon" in Venezuela and Guatemala

I'll add an answer since the current accepted answer doesn't reflect the situation in Guatemala. The answer is very simple, too. In Guatemalan Spanish cuchara is the word you use. Context will make ...
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  • 530
10 votes
Accepted

Uso de "Cada" sin nada detrás

Sí, se puede, pero ha caído en gran desuso. Este artículo que menciona el origen del uso — no es simplemente cada vez que sin la palabra vez, la forma cada vez que vino después. También es notado en ...
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10 votes
Accepted

¿Qué significa "el mistolero"?

"Mistolero" means "Santiagueño" (from Santiago del Estero, Argentina). "Gato santiagueño" is a variant (as danced in Santiago) of the Gato, a traditional folkloric dance. ...
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  • 634
9 votes

What is the difference between Spanish and Ladino?

Spanish is the old Castilian language, a Romance one, related to Portuguese, Galician and Catalan, with influences from Arabic and French, and which has evolved naturally since, spoken nowadays in ...
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  • 3,565
9 votes
Accepted

How diverse is Spanish

Spanish varies a lot. Definitely moreso than any of the main English dialects, although perhaps Indian English vs other Englishes might show the level to which people's native dialects can differ. ...
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9 votes
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Why does Colombian sound so different from Mexican?

They sound different, simply put, because Spanish is an evolving language. To address why could be difficult because there are many factors: isolation, exposure to other languages, development of ...
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9 votes

I'm an English-speaking American relearning Spanish -- which dialect do I choose?

According to this source, Mexican Spanish (actually ten dialects of Mexican Spanish from different parts of Mexico!) is the most spoken dialect of Spanish in the United States, followed by Caribbean ...
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  • 38.9k
9 votes
Accepted

Pronunciation of the combination "st" in Spanish accents

This affrication of /st/ is indeed particular to Western Andalusian: An affricated dentoalveolar stop [ts] (listo [ˈlitso]) has been described as a variant of /st/-clusters. This sound is ...
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  • 19k
8 votes

Why does Colombian sound so different from Mexican?

The same reason British, American and Australian English (among others) sounds different. People from different regions tend to develop their own accent, and with time maybe their own dialect or "...
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  • 47.6k
8 votes

Are there any dialects of modern Spanish which preserve a phonemic distinction between b and v?

Short answer: no. Long answer: it is possible to hear the sound [v] as an allophone (that is, alternate) for /b/, but you won't hear it in any way systematically between the written letters b and v. ...
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8 votes

Are there any dialects of modern Spanish which preserve a phonemic distinction between b and v?

Puerto Rican Spanish As mentioned in this Linguistics SE question, a study on Puerto Rican Spanish speakers showed that they pronounce orthographic "v" /b/ as [v] more than half the time, ...
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  • 19k
8 votes
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Gentilicio para Austria ¿Qué determina el empleo de una u otra forma?

El Diccionario panhispánico de dudas tiene una entrada sobre esto: -íaco -ca o -iaco -ca. 1. Sufijo que forma adjetivos que indican relación con lo designado por el sustantivo base: elegíaco o ...
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  • 33.4k
8 votes

I'm an English-speaking American relearning Spanish -- which dialect do I choose?

First, most Spanish speakers very much enjoy communicating with Spanish speakers from other countries or regions. One can enjoy the feeling of speaking slightly differently but still understanding ...
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  • 10.6k
8 votes

Which parts of México pronounce “ll” (like in tortilla) as “j” instead of “y”?

ᴛᴏᴏ ʟᴏɴɢ, ᴅɪᴅɴ’ᴛ ʀᴇᴀᴅ The short story is that Spanish speakers’ habit of pronouncing English yellow like jello is not about the region but rather about what happens to that sound whenever it shows up ...
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  • 2,001
7 votes

Spanish for "link"

The original meaning of link, IIUIC, is each of the rings of a chain. That is Spanish is eslabón. (cf. The missing link / El eslabón perdido). Then, in English, link is also used to mean connection or ...
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  • 2,265
7 votes

Vocal epentética en el infinitivo del español colombiano

A falta de una respuesta más académica, recojo aquí lo más relevante de lo que se ha dicho en los comentarios, más alguna cosa que he investigado en el intertanto. Si se juzga oportuno, lo podemos ...
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  • 2,261
7 votes

Dime y decime ¿Son intercambiables?

Respuesta rápida Ambos son correctos. Dime es el más extendido en América y España. Decime se usa solo en algunos paises de America del Sur. Respuesta detallada 1.1) Diferencia? Decime es un voseo, ...
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6 votes

Does "parientes" ever mean "parents," or is it always "relatives"?

In modern, spoken Spanish, for the most part, yes, "parientes" means "relatives." However, it is worth noting that, according to the Real Academia Española, "pariente" can also mean, by definition ...
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  • 347
6 votes
Accepted

Spanish for "spoon" in Venezuela and Guatemala

Feel free to say cuchara, the situation and the context will be enough for your interlocutor to understand if your're talking about a spoon... or not. Although is told that in Guatemala people ...
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6 votes

Zipper: "cierre" vs "cremallera"

In Spain is much more common to hear cremallera. You could use cierre and people would still understand you, provided that there is enough context Se me ha enganchado el cierre. Actually, the ...
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  • 47.6k
6 votes
Accepted

¿Puede escindirse el castellano en el futuro?

¿Puede? Absolutamente. De hecho ya ha pasado hasta cierto punto (desde el castellano áurico tenemos el ladino, y más recientemente tenemos los criollos como chavacano o pelenquero). Pero que pase ...
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6 votes

¿Es "tronco" una grosería en Hispanoamérica?

En Colombia no es una grosería. Es un sinónimo de lerdo, lento. Es antónimo de ágil. Por ejemplo: Ese es un equipo de troncos... Refiriéndose a un equipo de jugadores de fútbol, indica que el ...
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  • 1,007
6 votes
Accepted

¿A qué se debe la aparición de la forma "aynno" en textos del siglo XIV?

En este caso, resulta que la Wikipedia tenía la respuesta. El navarroaragonés era una lengua romance hablada en el valle del Ebro durante la Edad Media. Dentro del navarroaragonés hubo varios ...
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  • 76.3k
5 votes

Pronunciation of "ll" in Mexico

The original spanish pronunciation of ll is a palatalized l (full tongue against the palate). This sound diverged through time and different areas. In México you mean hear it as the y in yellow or ...
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5 votes

Spanish for "spoon" in Venezuela and Guatemala

While it is true that in Venezuela "cuchara" can be slang for vagina, it's a perfectly safe word to use. Everyone uses it and no one will think it's vulgar. "Cucharilla" is for small spoons like a ...
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  • 51
5 votes
Accepted

pronunciation of final n as [ŋ]

This is a normal feature of Spanish (and indeed many other languages) called assimilation. More specifically, in this instance, it's called anticipatory coarticulation. When the normally alveolar ...
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5 votes
Accepted

Different use of tenses in Iberian vs South American (and/or Andean) Spanish

Yes. I am focusing in the present perfect and its usage in comparison with the simple present. From El perfecto simple y el perfecto compuesto en Hispanoamérica: la inclusión o exclusión del ahora de ...
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  • 33.4k
5 votes

Use of "usted" to convey formality *and* affection? (in Ecuador)

I do not know much about Ecuadorian way of speaking but since you asked about Colombia let me say this. We mainly use two forms: Usted and Vos. (there are many questions on this site about tuteo and ...
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  • 10.5k

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