23

Indeed, if you came to live to Southern Spain (the Andalusian region), probably you'll be hearing that word a lot, depending on the city you are living in. You may hear it more often in Sevilla, but you can also hear it in Cádiz, Málaga and other places. The words illo, illa are just shortened forms of chiquillo and chiquilla: chiquillo, lla Del dim....


11

Parientes always means relatives, never parents. I'm not very sure why your friends said that.


11

I'll add an answer since the current accepted answer doesn't reflect the situation in Guatemala. The answer is very simple, too. In Guatemalan Spanish cuchara is the word you use. Context will make it very clear, and, unless you're among close friends, no one is going to assume you're using the slang term. Necesito una cuchara... Si no, no puedo comer. ...


10

Sí, se puede, pero ha caído en gran desuso. Este artículo que menciona el origen del uso — no es simplemente cada vez que sin la palabra vez, la forma cada vez que vino después. También es notado en otro libro de gramática. La locución registra usos académicos en 2000 y se evidencia en contextos más informales en 2015. Según Google N-Grams, podemos ver que ...


10

"Mistolero" means "Santiagueño" (from Santiago del Estero, Argentina). "Gato santiagueño" is a variant (as danced in Santiago) of the Gato, a traditional folkloric dance. The name derives from the mistol tree, very common in the province: El mistol suele identificarse con la provincia de Santiago del Estero al punto que ...


9

Spanish is the old Castilian language, a Romance one, related to Portuguese, Galician and Catalan, with influences from Arabic and French, and which has evolved naturally since, spoken nowadays in Spain, Hispanic America (including South of USA), Equatorial Guinea and Philippines. Ladino is the same old Castilian language, also romance, also related to ...


9

Spanish varies a lot. Definitely moreso than any of the main English dialects, although perhaps Indian English vs other Englishes might show the level to which people's native dialects can differ. That said, there also exists what is known as Standard Spanish. It's a sort of neutral Spanish that — as its name suggests — standardizes certain aspects of ...


9

They sound different, simply put, because Spanish is an evolving language. To address why could be difficult because there are many factors: isolation, exposure to other languages, development of local colloquialisms, etc. There are several accents of both Colombian Spanish and Mexican Spanish, all with their own distinguishing characteristics (differences ...


9

According to this source, Mexican Spanish (actually ten dialects of Mexican Spanish from different parts of Mexico!) is the most spoken dialect of Spanish in the United States, followed by Caribbean Spanish (Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Panamanian, Venezuelan, and some varieties of Colombian Spanish) and finally Central American Spanish. For an American, ...


9

This affrication of /st/ is indeed particular to Western Andalusian: An affricated dentoalveolar stop [ts] (listo [ˈlitso]) has been described as a variant of /st/-clusters. This sound is perceptually and acoustically similar to [th], another /st/-allophone in Seville Spanish. Affrication of /st/-clusters in Western Andalusian Spanish: variation and change ...


8

The same reason British, American and Australian English (among others) sounds different. People from different regions tend to develop their own accent, and with time maybe their own dialect or "version" of the language. Spanish from the south of Spain (Andalusia) sounds different from the Spanish from the "center" regions, such as Madrid or Valladolid, ...


8

Short answer: no. Long answer: it is possible to hear the sound [v] as an allophone (that is, alternate) for /b/, but you won't hear it in any way systematically between the written letters b and v. There are a number of reasons for that. For speakers in areas where Spanish is the only Romance language around, the emergence of [v] will be dictated by ...


8

El Diccionario panhispánico de dudas tiene una entrada sobre esto: -íaco -ca o -iaco -ca. 1. Sufijo que forma adjetivos que indican relación con lo designado por el sustantivo base: elegíaco o elegiaco (‘de la elegía’), austríaco o austriaco (‘de Austria’). Pero lo importante viene en el 2.º punto: 2. La acentuación etimológica latina es -íaco [í - a - ko]...


8

First, most Spanish speakers very much enjoy communicating with Spanish speakers from other countries or regions. One can enjoy the feeling of speaking slightly differently but still understanding each other. Also, finding differences in, for example, the names of foods, is fun. It will be a little bit less confusing for the people you communicate with if ...


7

A falta de una respuesta más académica, recojo aquí lo más relevante de lo que se ha dicho en los comentarios, más alguna cosa que he investigado en el intertanto. Si se juzga oportuno, lo podemos convertir en wiki para que aporte más gente. La epéntesis se refiere a la aparición de un sonido (previamente inexistente) en una palabra. El DRAE cita como ...


7

Puerto Rican Spanish As mentioned in this Linguistics SE question, a study on Puerto Rican Spanish speakers showed that they pronounce orthographic "v" /b/ as [v] more than half the time, but never pronounce orthographic "b" /b/ as [v]. The author suggests it may be an effect of hypercorrection: Native Spanish speaking college students ...


7

Respuesta rápida Ambos son correctos. Dime es el más extendido en América y España. Decime se usa solo en algunos paises de America del Sur. Respuesta detallada 1.1) Diferencia? Decime es un voseo, usado en algunos paises de América, especialmente en Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay. En España, México, Cuba, Venezuela, etc. no se usa. Y en otros, como Colombia, ...


6

In modern, spoken Spanish, for the most part, yes, "parientes" means "relatives." However, it is worth noting that, according to the Real Academia Española, "pariente" can also mean, by definition number five: 5. m. pl. ant. Los padres. i.e. "parents" Note, however, that the RAE points out that this is an outdated definition, and therefore is currently ...


6

The original meaning of link, IIUIC, is each of the rings of a chain. That is Spanish is eslabón. (cf. The missing link / El eslabón perdido). Then, in English, link is also used to mean conection or even relation. That in Spanish would be conexión, enlace or relación. In Internet, link is actually a short form of the original hyperlink (remember that HTTP ...


6

Feel free to say cuchara, the situation and the context will be enough for your interlocutor to understand if your're talking about a spoon... or not. Although is told that in Guatemala people replace this word with the diminutive "cucharilla" when speaking about spoons to avoid confusion, it's not true: in Guatemala people do say cuchara for a spoon, and ...


6

In Spain is much more common to hear cremallera. You could use cierre and people would still understand you, provided that there is enough context Se me ha enganchado el cierre. Actually, the definition of cremallera is el cierre que se aplica a una abertura longitudinal cierre en prendas de vestir o bolsos. which implies that other pieces of ...


6

¿Puede? Absolutamente. De hecho ya ha pasado hasta cierto punto (desde el castellano áurico tenemos el ladino, y más recientemente tenemos los criollos como chavacano o pelenquero). Pero que pase de nuevo en el futuro, lo dudo sinceramente. La oportunidad ya nos ha pasado por dos razones: aumento en intercomunicación y mejoras en sistemas educativos. ¿...


6

En Colombia no es una grosería. Es un sinónimo de lerdo, lento. Es antónimo de ágil. Por ejemplo: Ese es un equipo de troncos... Refiriéndose a un equipo de jugadores de fútbol, indica que el equipo es malo porque los jugadores son lentos.


6

En este caso, resulta que la Wikipedia tenía la respuesta. El navarroaragonés era una lengua romance hablada en el valle del Ebro durante la Edad Media. Dentro del navarroaragonés hubo varios dialectos. El romance navarro, por ejemplo, que se caracterizaba (entre otras cosas) porque los fonemas palatales /ɲ/ (ñ) y /ʎ/ (ll) se representaban mediante i ...


6

ᴛᴏᴏ ʟᴏɴɢ, ᴅɪᴅɴ’ᴛ ʀᴇᴀᴅ The short story is that Spanish speakers’ habit of pronouncing English yellow like jello is not about the region but rather about what happens to that sound whenever it shows up at the very start of an utterance, or after an ‹n› or ‹l›. Despite appearances, this is actually unrelated to how all of Mexico treats words spelled with ‹ll›...


5

The original spanish pronunciation of ll is a palatalized l (full tongue against the palate). This sound diverged through time and different areas. In México you mean hear it as the y in yellow or like j in jello, whereas in most of Argentina and Uruguay you will hear it as sh in show. Don't worry much about the pronunciation. In general, spanish words are ...


5

While it is true that in Venezuela "cuchara" can be slang for vagina, it's a perfectly safe word to use. Everyone uses it and no one will think it's vulgar. "Cucharilla" is for small spoons like a teaspoon. "Cuchara" is for the bigger, soup spoon. Source: Born, raised and living in Venezuela.


5

This is a normal feature of Spanish (and indeed many other languages) called assimilation. More specifically, in this instance, it's called anticipatory coarticulation. When the normally alveolar voiced nasal /n/ immediately precedes a velar (for Spanish you have /k/, /g/, and /x/), the articulatory position of the /n/ is pushed back in preparation for the ...


5

Yes. I am focusing in the present perfect and its usage in comparison with the simple present. From El perfecto simple y el perfecto compuesto en Hispanoamérica: la inclusión o exclusión del ahora de la enunciación → 2. Análisis cuantitativo del perfecto simple y del perfecto compuesto No hay uniformidad cuantitativa en el empleo de ambas formas en todo el ...


5

I do not know much about Ecuadorian way of speaking but since you asked about Colombia let me say this. We mainly use two forms: Usted and Vos. (there are many questions on this site about tuteo and voseo that you could check out.) The Usted is the more commonly used on the south and central region while vos is more used around the "coffee region". However ...


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