12 votes

Personal pronouns: When to hook at the end of verb and when to keep separate?

The rules themselves are quite complicated especially taking into account dialectal concerns in the north of Spain where due to influence from other languages like Asturian can affect regional speech (...
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10 votes
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The difference between the use of "les" and "los"

This link about the usage of pronouns lo(s), la(s), le(s) might be useful. Basically, lo and la are pronouns used to refer to the direct complement in a sentence, while le is used to refer to a ...
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9 votes
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Personal pronouns: When to hook at the end of verb and when to keep separate?

They can go "hooked" to the verb when the verb is in imperative, infinitive or gerund. ¿por qué no puede hacerlo así? / ¿por qué no lo puede hacer así? ¿por qué no están haciéndolo así? / ¿...
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8 votes
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Is "No la hacemos" a proper translation to "We are not doing it"? Should it be "no lo hacemos"?

La could work, if what you're doing is something feminine (like la tarea). Lo is used when what you're doing is masculine (like el trabajo). If what you're doing has no gender because it's a verb ...
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8 votes
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Dejarte irte, dejarte ir, dejar irte

Según entiendo (1) y (2) son correctas, aunque (1) suena tanto a frase redundante que casi ningún hablante la articularía naturalmente. (1) Dejarte irte fue un error. (2) Dejarte ir fue un error. ...
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6 votes
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'Lo bastante/suficientemente + adjetivo + como para' - Is it possible to drop 'lo' and 'como para'?

Your question asks for several alternative forms. From the start I'd say that the versions with suficientemente are all correct, whether they use lo and/or como: ¿Es lo suficientemente inteligente ...
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  • 39k
6 votes

How to translate "I'm sorry for trying"?

Another option that does not use the infinitive: Perdona que lo intentara In this case, as the verb is not in its infinitive form, the object pronoun goes before it. You can use the infinitive in ...
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6 votes
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How to translate "I'm sorry for trying"?

The correct form would be Siento haberlo intentado. In Spanish the object pronouns la, le, lo etc. are always enclitic (they follow the verb) if it's an infinitive, and they're written as one word ...
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  • 39k
6 votes

Sobre el clítico locativo medieval "y"

Hay viene inequívocamente de la contracción hay < ha hi < ha ahí (cf. cat. hi ha, fr. il y a). No obstante la hipótesis de que soy, doy, voy, estoy (de so, do, vo, esto) también vengan de tal ...
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  • 19.1k
5 votes

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre "suficiente" y "lo suficiente"?

The word "lo" is the neutral definite article. It is used when you need to use the definite article to refer to an abstract concept that comes from an adjective. In essence, "lo suficiente" means "...
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5 votes
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¿Cuál es la diferencia entre "suficiente" y "lo suficiente"?

"Suficiente" is an adjective, and as such determines a noun: No queda suficiente comida. There is a special case that can also determine a verb: when it precedes by a neutral article "lo" (...
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5 votes
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When does one replace "le/les" with the pronoun "se"?

The indirect object pronouns le & les change to se when preceding the direct object pronouns lo, la, los & las. I give it to him- Se lo doy. (can't be Le lo doy) She tells her mom ...
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  • 74
4 votes

When to use "lo" and "le"?

Indeed, there are rules, but it is important to distinguish between the rules that govern Standard Spanish (which should be used in formal communication) and informal or dialectal Spanish — which ...
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4 votes
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Indirect Object and neuter "lo" usage with inanimate objects

In Standard Spanish, there is generally no distinction made in animacy for the object pronouns1. Lo and la are used for direct objects, being lo for masculine2 and la for feminine. Le is used for ...
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4 votes

¿A qué hace referencia "lo" en "lo flipo"?

Creo que la lista de acepciones del a RAE no es del todo completa. Creo que muchas veces se usa "flipar" con el sentido de alucinar, que sí es transitivo tr. Sorprender, asombrar, deslumbrar. U. ...
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4 votes

Dado "... existe un tipo de sordera (...). Se *le* conoce como X", ¿podríamos decir "se *lo* conoce"?

«Se le conoce como la “sordera de los Monge”» es leísmo (le es pronombre dativo y en este caso corresponde acusativo, porque la sordera o el tipo de sordera en cuestión son objeto directo del verbo ...
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  • 39k
4 votes

Why is an indirect object used and not a direct object?

Well, I'm not sure about the analysis that you made about the English structure of the sentence. According to the Cambridge Dictionary ask to put a question to someone, or to request an answer ...
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  • 7,096
3 votes

Personal pronouns: When to hook at the end of verb and when to keep separate?

When the verb contains an infinitive form (plain verb, not modified by conjugation), it is equally valid to place the direct object pronoun (me, lo) at the end of the infinitive verb, or before the ...
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  • 846
3 votes

The difference between the use of "les" and "los"

"El maestro los lee" would mean that the teacher reads THEM. "El maestro les lee" means the teacher reads TO them. "El maestro nos lee" means the teacher reads to US.
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  • 31
3 votes

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre "suficiente" y "lo suficiente"?

To complement the previous answer, the function of lo is to render the adjective into a noun. So, you can have sentences like lo bonito siempre atrae más, where bonito is an adjective rendered into a ...
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  • 76.6k
3 votes

When does one replace "le/les" with the pronoun "se"?

As @toni mentioned the use of le/les or se depends on the type of the Object Pronouns (direct vs. indirect pronombres): DO Pronouns: me, te, lo/la, nos, os, los/las IO Pronounce: me, te, le, nos, os, ...
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3 votes

What's the function of "lo" in "lo que"?

"Lo que" indeed means "what", not in the interrogative sense, but in the sense of "that which..." Consider the following examples: Lo que importa es... / What matters is....
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  • 51
3 votes
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Is the indirect pronoun not always necessary? In these examples shouldn't they all have "le" or "les"?

There are three situations in which the indirect object pronoun, when the indirect object itself is explicitly mentioned, is required: Verbs of the gustar-type You cannot say Algo gusta al niño, you ...
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3 votes
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Excepciones de verbos a pronombres enclíticos

Todos los verbos, en algunas de sus formas (tiempos, modos) y ciertas condiciones, aceptan pronombres enclíticos. Las reglas son algo complicadas pero básicamente siempre es correcto el pronombre ...
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3 votes
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Pregunta sobre uso de pronombres en "dejarse enredar en"

La frase problemática es “dejarse enredar”. Esta es una frase no finita, es decir, una frase con un verbo principal no conjugado (en este caso, un verbo en infinitivo); este verbo principal es dejarse....
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  • 39k
2 votes

What does "lo" in "(no) lo es" refer to?

It is my understanding that "todo" requires the neuter pronoun "lo" when "todo" is not further modified/explained. For example, you could say "Juan lo sabe todo" but not "Juan sabe todo." However, ...
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  • 51
2 votes

¿Es lo mismo decir "El tiempo es 'el' que es" que "El tiempo es 'lo' que es"?

No son intercambiables. En la primera frase: El tiempo es el que es. "El" hace referencia al propio tiempo. El sentido de la frase implica que el tiempo es invariable, que el tiempo que existe es ...
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  • 76.6k
2 votes
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Using lo/la instead of eso/esa (object vs. demonstrative pronouns)

Both of your options are correct and perfectly acceptable. You should translate demonstrative pronouns as they are: (D.P.) Can you hold this for me? => ¿Me puedes sostener esto? (D.P.) Can you ...
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2 votes
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Why do we say "preparó unos polvos que... les hacían llorar" and not "los hacían llorar"?

Seemingly hacer + infinitive constructions in spanish can be very tricky syntactically speaking. And it is even trickier in this case because llorar is normally intransitive, but can be used as ...
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