Questions tagged [sinónimos]

Términos con el mismo, o casi, significado en al menos uno de sus sentidos. // Terms with the same or almost the same meaning in at least one of their senses.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
45
votes
11answers
47k views

Is there a difference between “español” and “castellano”? // ¿Hay alguna diferencia entre “español” y “castellano”?

I always thought the two could be used interchangeably (meaning "the Spanish language"). But I recently got into an argument with someone where they insisted there was a difference (although I didn't ...
20
votes
9answers
13k views

Difference between “computadora” and “ordenador”

Español Vi un cartel fuera de una tienda que decía: "Computadoras y ordenadores" en un cuadro "cubano" fuera de New York City, En un principio, creo que ambas palabras significan "computer". Pero, ¿...
17
votes
6answers
37k views

What is the difference between allí and ahí (“there”)?

English What is the difference between allí and ahí? Is there any difference in pronunciation between the two? Are there any contexts where one is correct and one is wrong, or are they completely ...
16
votes
3answers
14k views

“Vegetable”: verdura vs. vegetal

What is the difference between verduras and vegetales? In what situations can one be used as a translation for "vegetables" and the other cannot?
16
votes
1answer
8k views

Words for “East” and “West” in Spanish?

The words I learned when beginning Spanish for east and west are 'este' and 'oeste', which are basically cognates of their English equivalents. But I've been told that there are other words to denote ...
15
votes
1answer
2k views

“Chorizo” como sinónimo de “ladrón”

¿Por qué en España la palabra "chorizo" es coloquialmente usada para referirse a los ladrones?
14
votes
4answers
4k views

How to decide between “ahora” and “ya” for the sense “now”?

I know that ya has additional meanings besides simply now, such as already. But considering just the sense of ya which does mean now, when should I use it and when should I use ahora, which only has ...
13
votes
4answers
43k views

Cuándo usar “usar” o “utilizar”

Español Ambos términos tienen un significado muy parecido. Según la RAE, el único uso de 'utilizar' es "Aprovecharse de algo" y el significado que me interesa de 'usar' es "Hacer servir ...
13
votes
3answers
15k views

When to use “tratar de” and when to use “intentar” for “to try to”?

Spanish has three words that can translate to English to try. Probar is easy to remember because it's used for sample or taste, like: Have you ever tried tacos el pastor? But I never know when to ...
12
votes
2answers
12k views

Armpit: sobaco vs. axila

"Armpit" in English can be translated as either sobaco or axila in Spanish. Is each term used in different regions, or are they both used across the Spanish-speaking world? What is the difference, or ...
12
votes
4answers
3k views

What is the difference between “catedrático,” “docente,” “maestro,” and “profesor?”

Primero mi pregunta en español: ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre «catedrático», «docente», «maestro», y «profesor»? Details in English: Earlier this year, I prepared to take a DELE exam, more ...
12
votes
2answers
11k views

“Aún” vs. “todavía”, what's the difference?

Somebody just asked me to correct something, and I found that I changed one of their instances of todavía to aún. I didn't do this because todavía wouldn't have worked in the sentence, but rather ...
10
votes
5answers
7k views

Difference between “manejar” and “conducir”

Today's word of the day on spanishdict.com is despacio. There I found this sentence: A mi hermano le fastidia cuando la gente que quiere manejar despacio conduce en el canal de velocidad. I ...
10
votes
3answers
26k views

What is the difference between “por siempre” and “para siempre” to say “forever”?

I have seen "forever" translated as both por siempre and para siempre. What is the difference? Are there contexts where you must use one or the other?
10
votes
2answers
2k views

Origin and use of “echar de menos”

I've always found peculiar that the phrase echar de menos is synonymous of the verb extrañar. For example: Te echaré de menos. is equivalent to: Te extrañaré. Based on TV, its use is most ...
9
votes
8answers
46k views

Is there a difference between “cilantro” and “culantro” in Spanish?

I've seen the American English "cilantro" (British English "coriander") translated into Spanish as both cilantro and culantro. What is the difference? Are they synonyms used interchangeably, or is the ...
9
votes
2answers
9k views

Different words for “stop”

In English, we have a fairly generic verb "to stop" that can be used in many different contexts. For example: Stop talking to me! The driver saw the red light and stopped his car. You really need to ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Differences between “aun”, “hasta”, and “incluso” to indicate extremes?

When referring to an extreme example for comparison, English seems to have just one word, even: Even an idiot could do it. But Spanish seems to have three: aun hasta incluso I had always used ...
9
votes
3answers
9k views

Are there any subtle differences between “de nuevo” and “otra vez”?

There are two very common ways in Spanish to say the equivalent of "again": de nuevo otra vez But I use them pretty randomly because I've never been able to pick up on any differences in how native ...
9
votes
4answers
46k views

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre agrio, ácido y amargo?

Estuve investigando sobre los 5 sabores básicos que puede sentir el humano. En particular los que me interesa traducir y llegar a consenso son, en inglés, bitter y sour. Sour está asociado al limón, ...
9
votes
1answer
7k views

“Echar” vs “tirar” vs “lanzar” vs “arrojar” vs “disparar” (to throw)

The basic meaning of them all as I understand it is: To throw Disparar seems to pertain exclusively to shooting or throwing something for the sole purpose of harming (maybe to shoot is the best ...
8
votes
4answers
7k views

Waterfall: cascada vs. catarata

What is the difference between cascada and catarata as translations for the English "waterfall"? Are they synonyms, or is there a difference?
8
votes
2answers
3k views

¿Cuál es el origen de la palabra “repelús”?

El otro día me encontré con estos dos sinóminos de repelús: repeluzno y repeluco, dos palabras desconocidas para mí. Veo que las tres tienen la misma raíz pero en el diccionario no aparece la ...
8
votes
3answers
681 views

Complemento vs. Suplemento

Is there any difference between the word "complemento" and "suplemento"? Do they really have the exact same meaning?. RAE (Real Academia Española) defines both as: Cosa o accidente que se añade a ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

Palabras en castellano análogas a “safety” y “security” en inglés

Según Google, las palabras inglesas "safety" y "security", traducidas al castellano, ambas significan "seguridad". Sin embargo, "safety" y "security" ...
8
votes
3answers
981 views

What is the difference between different ways of expressing desire and intention?

I hear a lot of different ways to express the idea of wanting something or wanting to do something. What is the difference between them? Yo quiero (algo o hacer algo o que pase algo) Me gustaría ... ...
7
votes
2answers
867 views

¿Cuándo puedo usar 'dificultoso' en vez de 'difícil'?

No entiendo la diferencia, si la hay, entre el uso de las dos palabras: dificultoso y difícil. Según el DLE: dificultoso: Difícil, lleno de impedimentos difícil: Que presenta obstáculos (‖ ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre “abastecer” y “suministrar”? ¿Cuál debe usarse para traducir “The glaciers that supply Lima”?

Busco una buena traducción del verbo "to supply", tal como en la frase The glaciers that supply Lima with water are melting. Las dos traducciones que tengo presente son "abastecer" y "suministrar"...
7
votes
2answers
262 views

¿Existe alguna palabra para expresar algo que es más que un deseo pero menos que una necesidad?

Para dar un ejemplo, supongamos que a una persona le gusta mucho comer fruta , comer fruta para esta persona es un deseo, pero si bien no comer fruta podría (potencial) afectar su salud, no se va a ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of “mueco” vs. “mellado” for “toothless”

The RAE does not have an entry for mueco or mueca, a term commonly used in Colombia to describe a toothless person. However, the expression hacer muecas is understood in the traditional sense as a ...
7
votes
1answer
3k views

¿Por qué el femenino de “príncipe” es “princesa” y no “príncipa” o “principesa”?

Muchos aprendimos la palabra italiano principessa viendo la película La vida es bella (1997), cuando el personaje de Roberto Benigni saluda a su amada con un buongiorno principessa. Esto es, buenos ...
6
votes
4answers
463 views

In a particular context, is it common for 'después' and 'luego' to be used interchangeably?

Salieron a comer y luego fueron a nadar. Salieron a comer y después fueron a nadar. Both of these translate to: They went out for lunch and then went for a swim. In English, there are so many words ...
6
votes
6answers
13k views

Difference between “empezar” and “comenzar” [duplicate]

What is the difference between empezar and comenzar? Is one more formal than the other?
6
votes
4answers
28k views

to drink: beber vs. tomar

I have heard beber and tomar used interchangeably as translations for the English "to drink." Is there any difference between the two, or are they exact synonyms when describing drinking a liquid? Are ...
6
votes
2answers
460 views

Alternativas a “irretrasable”

La vicepresidenta del Gobierno de España dijo recientemente "medidas irretrasables" que no existe en el español. Yo encuentro como sinónimos medidas inaplazables, medidas de imposible retraso. ¿Qué ...
6
votes
2answers
11k views

Is there a difference between “ambos” and “los dos”?

Is there a difference between "ambos" and "los dos"? ¿Hay alguna diferencia entre "ambos" y "los dos"? Example: Me gustan los dos. Me gustan ambos.
6
votes
3answers
1k views

How to choose between “carecer” and “faltar”?

I've always used "faltar" to mean "to lack, to be missing". But in my reading I find that "carecer" seems to mean exactly the same. When should I use the one or the other? Are there some differences?...
6
votes
2answers
135 views

Can a person “agarrar” something? / ¿Puede una persona “agarrar” algo?

I was recently helping some Spanish-speaking students with something, in which they had to translate take. The translation I've learned in classes is tomar, but that was interpreted as "to drink", so ...
6
votes
4answers
169 views

Are “borroso” and “empañado” synonymous?

My Spanish course book says "borroso" and "empañado" are synonymous but I'm not sure about that. I searched these two words on google images and I got steamed up glass for "empañado" and blurry ...
6
votes
2answers
201 views

Traducción de “assumption” diferente a “supuestos”

Estoy trabajando en un proyecto y no me termina de gustar la traducción de "assumptions" por "supuestos". La frase que quiero traducir es: The following are a list of assumptions. ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

feliz vs. alegre vs. dichoso

I recently heard dichoso used to mean feliz. Looking up dichoso in a dictionary shows it means "happy" (or "blessed"). What is the difference between dichoso, feliz, and alegre to mean "happy"? Are ...
6
votes
1answer
111 views

¿Cómo se puede diferenciar entre “answers” y “responses” cuando ambas pueden traducirse como “respuestas”?

En el sitio Meta de Stack Overflow en español se ha formulado la siguiente pregunta interesante: ¿Deberíamos cambiar los literales de “respuestas” en la pantalla de actividad?. En ella se expone el ...
6
votes
1answer
157 views

Origen de escarlata como sinónimo de rojo

La palabra escarlata desde el DLE presenta una etimología bastante clara Del ár. hisp. iškarláṭ[a], este del gr. bizant. σιγιλλᾶτος sigillâtos 'tejido de lana o lino adornado con marcas en forma de ...
6
votes
1answer
106 views

What is the difference between “garrapo” and “rungo”?

Garrapo is m. y f. Sal. Cerdo que no ha cumplido un año. while Rungo is m. Sal. Cerdo de menos de un año. From the definitions, it seems that both words are used only in ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

“Lucha” vs “Pelea”: what's the difference?

The dictionary translates both as fight or struggle. Is there any subtle difference in usage or context, or is it just a matter of personal choice? Which of the two is preferred in Latin America (...
5
votes
2answers
50k views

Palabras del animal: puerco, cochi, cerdo

Hay varias palabras que he encontrado para referirse a un animal, pero no entiendo cuándo se usa cada una. ¿Cómo se distinguen los significados de: puerco, cochi y cerdo? Pido respuestas que ...
5
votes
2answers
147 views

¿Cuál es la mejor traducción para “wearable” en este texto?

Me han mandado una pregunta con respecto al siguiente artículo en inglés: Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices. La pregunta consta de la palabra "wearable", ...
5
votes
5answers
18k views

“¿Qué haciendo?” and “¿qué estás haciendo?”

What is the difference between "¿qué haciendo?" and "¿qué estás haciendo?" Do they mean 'How are you doing?' ¿Qué haciendo, loco? ¿Qué estás haciendo, loquillo?
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Break: romper vs. quebrar vs. quebrantar vs. partir

Off the top of my head, I can think of four Spanish translations for the English verb "to break": romper quebrar quebrantar partir In what cases can each be used, and what are the differences ...
5
votes
1answer
11k views

Sinónimo de “Ya que”

¿De qué otra forma puedo decir... Ya que me siento triste? o Ya que se ha comprobado... No quiero seguir repitiendo el YA QUE en un informe.