Questions tagged [reflexivos]

Verbs or pronouns describing reflexive actions (subject and direct object are the same). Verbos o pronombres que describen acciones reflexivas (el sujeto y el objeto directo son el mismo).

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26
votes
4answers
16k views

I forgot how to say “I forgot”

Okay, so I didn't really forget how to say it... I just wanted a clever question title. In my Spanish class I was taught that olvidarse is reflexive: Me olvidé (de la cita). Me olvidé (las ...
11
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4answers
8k views

“Voy a dormir” vs “me voy a dormir” - huge difference or not?

What is correct? Is there any grammatical difference between them? I have just stumbpled upon verbs ending with "-se". Before that I was thinking that "voy a" is the only way to say "I'm going to......
11
votes
3answers
26k views

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre comer y comerse?

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre el verbo normal comer y su forma reflexiva comerse? Si los significados son iguales, ¿cuál es la diferencia de connotación? Y, ¿se usa el reflexivo de la misma manera en ...
10
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3answers
2k views

“No se hable más” - Why the “se”?

As I read in this entry of Español Avanzado, no se hable más is a fix term to tell someone to not talk about this (topic) anymore. My question is: where does the "se" come from? What would ...
9
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2answers
4k views

Usage of “ver(se)” for “to seem/look” (te ves, se te ve, te veo, etc.)

The verb ver can be used in a few different constructions to convey how something looks or seems: Te ves bonita. Se te ve mal. Te veo bien. For the reflexive constructions, the WordReference entry ...
8
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2answers
5k views

¿Por qué dicen “me vi la película”?

He escuchado varias veces a mis amigos colombianos diciendo me vi la película. Pero cuando les pregunto por qué dicen así, no me pueden explicar el uso de reflexivo en éste caso. Lo he escuchado el ...
7
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3answers
4k views

How do you use the “passive se” with a reflexive verb?

What is the rule for using the "passive se" (e.g. "¿Cómo se dice?") with a reflexive verb that involves another se pronoun? For example, how would you translate "One takes a shower (ducharse) ...
6
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3answers
2k views

What exactly are the “passive se” and “impersonal se”?

Many materials for learning Spanish, discuss the "impersonal se" (e.g. ¿Se puede tocar esto?) and "passive se" (e.g. Se habla español.). What exactly are these forms grammatically? Is the se in both ...
6
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2answers
570 views

Gramática: no te hagas el bobo

No te hagas el bobo = Don't act like a fool No te me hagas el bobo = Don't act like a fool (but it has a different emphasis that is impossible to explain) Could anyone please explain the ...
6
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3answers
309 views

How do you specify/emphasize gender with third person reflexive verbs?

Primero mi pregunta en español: ¿Cómo se especifica/destaca género con verbos reflexivos en la tercera persona? Details in English: I recently came upon a sentence that went something like She ...
6
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2answers
187 views

How did the word “se” come to have so many usages in Spanish?

In modern Spanish, the word "se" has several uses. According to Butt & Benjamin's A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish, there are at least eight different uses. Among them we can count the ...
5
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3answers
864 views

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre enfrentar y enfrentarse?

Por favor explíquenme la diferencia entre las dos frases: desafíos a los que nos enfrentamos vs desafíos que enfrentamos Una frase usa el verbo enfrentarse y la otra, enfrentar. ¿Son ...
5
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1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “Va a un bar” and “Se va a un bar”?

I'm taking lessons on Memrise.com. Memrise indicates that both can mean, "she's going to a bar": - Va a un bar - Se va a un bar Why the difference in Spanish?
5
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5answers
1k views

Uses of “se”: “se rompió” o “rompió”

He leído las siguientes oraciones. Mi hermano menor se rompió la mayoría de vasos. Mi hermano menor rompió la mayoría de vasos. Dice que la segunda frase es correcta. ¿Pero por qué? Su hermano ...
5
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2answers
265 views

Why is “ me” used in “Se me descompuso el auto”?

"Se descompuso el auto" translates as The car broke down. "Se me descompuso el auto" translates as My car broke down. Can someone explain the use of 'me' in the second sentence? Is this a common way ...
5
votes
1answer
755 views

when se is needed for transitive verbs?

Note the following two sentences: Antes él había recogido las flores. He had gathered the flowers earlier. Él se había ganado un premio. He had won a prize. I'm pretty sure the use is reflexive, ...
5
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5answers
2k views

Why is it “me quedo” instead of “yo quedo”?

I'm beginning to learn Spanish, and one of the sentences I'm learning is Me quedo en mi casa Which means "I stay at home". So, if the "quedo" is conjugated for yo and not for me, like in "me ...
5
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1answer
151 views

Uses of “SE” : se discutió

Can you see the difference between no. 6 and no. 7? Are there any differences in meaning? Could you please answer the questions below? 6, En el coloquio se discutió un tema interesante. 6a, In ...
5
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1answer
193 views

Making a pronoun verb reflexive of its subject

In place of Apago las luces. we may make the verb reflexive of its subject and say Las luces se apagan. in order to emphasize the object instead of the subject. Some verbs already are ...
4
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3answers
2k views

How does “Te vas a cansar” mean “You're going to get tired”?

Why does "Te vas a cansar" mean "You're going to get tired"? Irse means to leave, to go, to die, to go away and to forget. There is no translation which means "to become something" for instance, "to ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Why, in “mis padres se llaman __”, do you need “se”?

I know there's another question about "se", but I don't understand the answer or know which of the scenarios described refers to this one. While learning Spanish, I'm supposed to know the sentence ...
4
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2answers
554 views

Why is “yo me quedo en casa” instead of “yo quedo en casa”?

So I understand that it's "me quedo" instead of "yo quedo" because the "yo" is omitted. Just like everything else in Spanish, the verb tense gives away what the pronoun is. Why is it then "yo me ...
4
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1answer
378 views

Olvidar vs Olvidarse

I was listening to one of Michael Thomas's Spanish tutorials and heard this sentence: a veces se olvidan invitarme. Why 'olvidarse' is used here instead of 'olvidar'? Is it wrong to just say: a ...
4
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2answers
215 views

Understanding why a pronoun and “que se” are used in a sentence

I have the following sentence below. si Alison no le hubiera dicho al jefe del banco que se callara yo lo habría golpeado English if Alison had not told the bank chief to shut up I would have ...
4
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2answers
1k views

Reflexives and use of “se” in “terminarse”

I'm slowing working my way through reflexive pronouns, and I understand that there are several uses of the pronoun 'se' : Accidental / unplanned circumstances (se me cayó el vaso) Passive Voice for ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Use of “me” in the phrase “me llevo este”

I would like to know what kind of word is "me" in the phrase "me llevo este" (meaning I'll take this one). Is it a reflexive verb? How can you tell? Thanks a lot.
4
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1answer
264 views

Using gustar in future tense

I'm studying Spanish and I'm having some hard time using gustar in future tense. I do understand that the verb is reflexive and that gustarse would translate to to please someone, so simple sentences ...
4
votes
1answer
133 views

Why use “le” in “se le oyo”?

What is the use of "le" in the following sentence: La única vez que se le oyó un comentario nostálgico fue a propósito de un piano de cola. I think oirse in this case means was heard. Is the le ...
4
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4answers
3k views

“se me da bien” — why “se”?

I can make sense of Me gusta (a mi) - it gives me pleasure. However, the expression Se me da bien -- I'm good at it doesn't make sense to me due to the presense of "se". If it was "me da ...
4
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1answer
4k views

¿Significan lo mismo “sí mismo” y “uno mismo”?

Paseando por un centro comercial hoy me he encontrado con la siguiente frase motivacional: La confianza en sí mismo es el primer secreto del éxito. La verdad es que la frase me sonó un poco ...
4
votes
1answer
731 views

Why does “reírse” always have reflexive?

It seems that reírse ("to laugh") is always used with the reflexive. Yo me río. (I laugh.) Él se rió. (He laughed.) Nos reíamos durante toda la película. (We laughed during the entire movie.) As I ...
4
votes
1answer
250 views

Is there a consistent rule for constructing reflexive verbs?

Is there a consistent rule to create reflexive verbs? When utilizing reflexive verbs are all verbs able to become reflexive verbs by adding, se at the end of the infinitive verb? I.E.: "lavarse", "...
4
votes
1answer
407 views

verbo reflexivo vs pronominal

¿Todo los verbos reflexivos son verbos pronominales? ¿Solo se puede identificar si los verbos son pronominales o no revisando los diccionarios? ¿Todos los verbos pueden ser pronominales? ¿Qué es la ...
4
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2answers
296 views

“No se puede conectar” vs “no puede conectarse”

As far as I know, they're identical. And are both grammatically correct and can be used interchangeably. Is this indeed the case?
4
votes
1answer
430 views

Second person singluar imperative of a reflexive verb ending in a diphthong

The question is pretty much in the title. If I have the verb lavarse, I know to make the imperative I use lávate. But what to do with a verb like afeitarse? Is it afeitate? My spellcheck thinks not....
4
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1answer
3k views

¿Cuál es la diferencia entre “se me olvidó” y “olvidé”?

¿Cuáles son las diferencias semánticas entre "se me olvidó" y "olvidé"? Ejemplo: Se me olvidó mi teléfono. Olvidé mi teléfono. Creo que cuando se usa el reflexivo, esto indica menos ...
4
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1answer
540 views

Is there a difference between “reflexivo” and “pronominal”?

In the context of Spanish linguistics, is there a difference in how the terms reflexivos and pronominales are used to describe verbs/pronouns? Note 1: question suggested in this Meta thread: Is there ...
3
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2answers
817 views

Is it true that the reflexive of “regresar” — “regresarse” — is not used in Spain?

I recently read (in what I thought was a pretty reputable grammar book) that "regresarse" is not used in Spain, but I had never heard this before. Is it true? If so, why don't Spaniards use it? Is ...
3
votes
4answers
244 views

How to use “les” in examples like this? [duplicate]

So whilst reading some sentences in Spanish I’ve noticed that sometimes there is the indirect object pronoun “le” or “les,” for which I know the basic function; but in sentences such as A los ...
3
votes
3answers
147 views

Imperative form - 'a matar'. How to negate it? How to build on reflexives?

I know you can say in the imperative way the following: a matar a matarlo Questions: Can you use the negative form? Example: "A no matar"? How do you use apply this construction to reflexive verbs? ...
3
votes
3answers
141 views

¿Se dice “La tierra 'sentía' o 'se sentía' húmeda y fría”?

¿Cuál de estas frases es correcta? La tierra sentía húmeda y fría La tierra se sentía húmeda y fría La frase es dicha por un personaje que narra en primera persona.
3
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6answers
2k views

Usage of 'se impersonal' ('la niña se come una manzana')

I've been using the Duolingo app to get some extra practice and have just come across the following questions: Translate: La niña se come una manzana. Ella se come la manzana. And the ...
3
votes
2answers
143 views

“que no se te olvide” vs “no te olvides”

I just learned the phrase "que no se te olvide ..." from that new Selena Gomez song. It seems to be an emphatic "don't you forget it". It took me awhile to wrap my head around ...
3
votes
2answers
102 views

Can all reflexive verbs be used as reciprocal verbs?

Can all reflexive verbs be used as reciprocal verbs and vice versa? When I try to think of a sentence involving each other I can always reconstruct it using myself even if it isn't very logical. ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

se pronoun in “no fault constructions”

One page I recently ran across discusses the concept of "no fault constructions" or verbs that use se in such a way to describe an action as taking place apart from the person who caused the action. ...
3
votes
1answer
41 views

Passive Reflexive (passive se) or Simple Reflexive?

I am having trouble recognizing the difference between the passive reflexive/passive se (se hace/is made) vs the simple reflexive (se hace/(he/she/it makes for it/her/himself). I have a specific ...
3
votes
2answers
178 views

La diferencia entre “se te mueve” y “se mueve”

“La clave de este ejercicio es que el vientre se te mueva con esfuerzo.” ¿Por qué se necesita te? se mueve ya está reflexivo...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Confundir(se): Passive or not?

In El Templo Del Sol of Las Aventuras De Tintín Tintín claims that he saw someone spying on him, his friend and a policeman. The policeman then responds: ¿No se habrá confundido? I figured out that ...
3
votes
2answers
195 views

Reflexive pronoun with another object/multiple objects

If I want to say "I wash myself and you," how is that said? "Se y te lavo?" Or "se lavo a mi y ti?" I haven't been able to find any information on this topic; most of what I've found is two objects ...
3
votes
0answers
263 views

“Voy de compras ” vs “me voy de compras”? [duplicate]

In my French textbook for learning Spanish there is a phrase that goes like this: Si Manola gana el millón, se va de compras con su familia. Then, when checking what "irse de compras" means, I ...