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Questions tagged [neutralidad-de-género]

Preguntas sobre neutralidad de género y lenguaje inclusivo.

7
votes
2answers
80 views

Are there feminine and masculine versions for every adjective and noun?

I'm wondering if there are feminine and masculine versions of every adjective or noun like "Genio" and "Enfadado" ( Which are masculine I think ) and if not how are they used for opposite genders?
3
votes
3answers
109 views

How is gender ambiguity handled by native speakers?

Motivation for the question: Let's say my son is describing to me something that was said at school, and I'm finding it hard to figure out whether it was said by some adults or by some students. (...
11
votes
1answer
118 views

¿Es posible ocultar mi género en Internet al hablar en español?

He notado que en inglés existen ciertas formas de enmascarar el género de alguien cuando se desconoce o no se quiere indicar. Por ejemplo, en sitios como The Workplace o Interpersonal skills se ...
13
votes
3answers
4k views

Is there a gender neutral plural form for “salsa dancer”?

I ask specifically for: Salseros y Salseras (male and female Salsa dancers, respectively) It would be great to be able to address a mixed group of people with a single unifying word.
14
votes
4answers
2k views

Avoid gender-bias in Spanish

I am not a native Spanish speaker, but I tend to read a spanish (mexican) newspaper to practise my Spanish language skills. However, I was reading this article about teachers in which I read the ...
5
votes
1answer
177 views

Gender illusions?

This is a multiple question about genders. Recently I just wondered about this subject while writing and thought: Why is juez or concejal considered masculine while agente and detective are not? ...
20
votes
3answers
309 views

Is the use of @ instead of 'a' or 'o' in order to refer to both masculine and femenine accepted?

I have seen several times the use of @ instead of 'a' or 'o' for refering masculine and femenine words at the same time. For example: Hola a tod@s. Is this an accepted use?