Questions tagged [etimología]

Origen de las palabras, razón de su existencia, significación y forma. // The origins of terms and their development through history.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Apertura” y “abertura”. Su uso y etimología

Abertura y apertura parecen venir del mismo vocablo latino apertura. Tienen significados diferentes. Imagino que el proceso fue más o menos como sigue: apertura se obtiene de la aceptación directa ...
3
votes
1answer
6k views

¿De dónde viene la diferente ortografía para “concejo” y “consejo”?

Me llama la atención la diferente ortografía para concejo y consejo. Al parecer tienen la misma etimología latina en la palabra consilium. Si esto no fuese cierto, ¿la similitud es mera ...
2
votes
1answer
410 views

What are the origins of the demonym “pinolero”? / Orígenes del término «pinolero»

While researching a little bit about Nicaragua for my Spanish class presentation, I became curious as to why there is no good explanation for the origins of the word “pinolero” Nicaraguans sometimes ...
8
votes
4answers
5k views

Why does “madre” have so many different meanings?

In Mexican spanish at least, I can think the following (I may be forgetting some): Andar hasta la madre ~ Being really drunk Estar hasta la madre ~ Being really far | Being sick/tired of ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

¿“Espero que hagas algo” o “espero hagas algo”?

¿Cuál es la forma correcta de utilizar este juego de verbos transitivos? "Espero que hagas como te ordeno". "Espero hagas como te ordeno". Es sólo un ejemplo pero tengo la duda porque la segunda ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

Basque words in Spanish vocabulary

Which are the words, parts of words and structures coming from Basque to Spanish language? And possibly in which periods did they become part of spoken Spanish and official Spanish (Castellano)?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the significance of the gender of a noun in Spanish? [closed]

I'm just relying on memorization to conjure the gender of nouns. Perhaps if I understood etymologically why these genders came about, I would have an easier time remembering. There are three ...
11
votes
1answer
911 views

What is the etymology of the word 'subir'? / ¿Cuál es la etimología de la palabra 'subir'?

For many years I've been asking myself this single and simple question : why subir, that should logically come from the latin sub-ire that we can translate into go down in English, does mean go up in ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

¿De dónde proviene la palabra 'meacamas'?

¿Cuales son el origen y significado de la primera parte de esa palabra, es decir, lo del 'me'? Si la primera parte es una forma abreviada de meter, o la de otro verbo semejante, en ese caso no está ...
7
votes
1answer
439 views

What is the meaning of the word KOS in the conquestadores stirrup shoe?

Most of the brass Conquistadores Stirrups sold in eBay probably are simple and cheap imitates, even if they have been created as worn out shoes with lots of repairs. I remember the stirrup shoes my ...
6
votes
2answers
663 views

Matutino and Vespertino

I see matutino and vespertino, meaning morning and afternoon, used to describe parts of the daily schedule in schools and church. They sound very formal. Are there more words like them to describe ...
4
votes
1answer
521 views

Is fiscalía related to fiscal?

Fiscalía in Spanish refers to a district attorney or public prosecutor. "Fiscal" (in English or Spanish) describes something related to finances. This always confused me because the words are very ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Condescendiente / Condescendant

Oh surprise, Condescendant has a very different meaning in English compared to Spanish. Condescendant: Assuming a tone of superiority or a patronizing attitude Condescendiente: adj. Que ...
5
votes
1answer
242 views

What is the etymology of the “diéresis” or “crema”?

This entry of the Diccionario panhispánico de dudas explains the uses of the diéresis or crema (the ¨ mark) in Spanish (it is mandatory over a u to indicate that this vowel must be pronounced in the ...
5
votes
1answer
418 views

What is the origin of word endings like -ducir, -vocar, -locar, -ludir, -mitir?

The word-endings -ducir, -locar, -vocar, -ludir, -mitir are quite common, each can take a lot of common prefixes to form real words, for example: conducir, producir, introducir, aducir, inducir, ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Origin of “vos” pronoun

How did the vos personal pronoun come to be? Is it etymologically related to vosotros in any way? Did it develop before or after the other personal pronouns used today (tú, usted, vosotros, etc)? Was ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Why does the preterite of “traducir” transform into “tradujo”?

As you will see below the preterite suffers from an odd transformation. Even native speakers make the mistake of conjugating the preterite of traducir wrong. For instance instead of traduje they ...
9
votes
1answer
3k views

What's the origin of the word “chido”?

What's the origin of the word "chido"? When did it become popular in Mexico? Examples: Qué chido esta tu carro. Estaría bien chido si ganara la lotería. RAE: chido, da. adj. Méx. bonito ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

Origin of the phrase “la quinta …” to denote an undesirable or faraway place

The Colombian phrase la quinta porra denotes an undesirable or faraway place. For example, ¡Váyase a la quinta porra! conveys the same meaning as Go to hell! The earliest use I could find in a ...
5
votes
3answers
662 views

Etymological origin of “false friends” between Spanish and English

Is there an etymological origin that can be called the main one that has created the list of "false friends" between Spanish and English? I'm constantly stumbling upon a new "false friend" when ...
4
votes
1answer
313 views

What is the origin of the word “tascalate”?

Another unusual Spanish word I collected in my travels is tascalate. It's a drink in Chiapas, Mexico and there are Wikipedia articles about it in English and in Spanish. But it's not in Wiktionary ...
16
votes
1answer
189 views

Is “al” a relatively new word?

I am curious about the history of the word "al". For example, was there a time when "a el" was the proper usage and "al" came later (presumably because of the slurring of speech)?

1
12 13 14 15
16