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I was watching a TV show today in Spanish and heard this. The subtitled version translates it as:

"Tit and soup do not fit in the mouth"

How would you translate this in a way that makes sense?

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  • The selected answer does explain the meaning, however, a better translation for an idiomatic expression is always an equivalent idiomatic expression, of which several are available for this expression in the other answers.
    – hlecuanda
    Nov 11, 2022 at 16:53

5 Answers 5

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El significado del dicho es que una persona no puede realizar dos cosas distintas a la vez y más si les están expresamente prohibidas y vetadas por las leyes.

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  • ¿ Como dices ? Teta en la boca no tiene nada que ver con vetada por ley....
    – Lambie
    May 9, 2021 at 19:37
  • While his rains the meaning of the idiom, it does not, however offer an equivalent idiomatic phrasrnor translation to English which is what was asked.
    – hlecuanda
    Nov 11, 2022 at 16:51
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You can't walk and chew gum at the same time.

The Spanish is more colorful. :)

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  • There are a couple of even more colorful idiomatic expressions in Spanish such as "No se puede chiflar y comer pinole" which is literally translated as "You can't whistle and eat pinole" (a sweet, very fine flour-like maize powder), but English also has its corful phrases such as "You can't have your cake and eat it, too" which in my opinion is the right way to translate this idiom.
    – hlecuanda
    Nov 11, 2022 at 16:48
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The Equivalent idiomatic expression in English would be

*You can't have your cake and eat it, too"

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Tienes, también.: "Sopas y Sorber no puede ser" Que se usa para cuando se quiere algo que excede lo común. No necesariamente imposible ( aunque así esté la sentencia ) si no por un exceso de ambición

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  • Esta es una expresión idiomática equivalente en español, pero la pregunta busca una expresión udiomatica equivalente en Ingles ¯_(ツ)_/¯
    – hlecuanda
    Nov 11, 2022 at 16:36
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I think another English expression with somewhat equivalent meaning might be "to bight off more than one can chew." There's a sort of literal resemblance, having to do with putting things in your mouth, but it's applied more widely to overextension or overambition.

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  • to bite, not bight.
    – Lambie
    Nov 12, 2022 at 16:31
  • Bite. Rite. I didn't write bite right.
    – cuevero
    Nov 15, 2022 at 3:20

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