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I'm familiar with the rule that if a word ends with a vowel, “s”, or “n”, then the stress is on the second-to-last syllable. Obviously this changes when one of the letters has an accent mark. However, I think I've discovered an exception to the rule, which is the name Luis. The way that this name is pronounced, it seems that there should definitely be an accent mark over the "i".

Do you know of any other exceptions to this rule that don't have accent marks?

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However, I think I've discovered an exception to the rule, which is the name Luis.

It is not an exception. "Ui" is a diphthong, which means that "Luis" has only one syllable. Single syllable words don't generally need accent marks.

Do y'all know of any other exceptions to this rule that don't have accent marks?

There are no such exceptions. Some words have an accent mark to tell them apart from other words (diacritical marks), even when the general rules say they don't need one. Not the other way around.

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  • Thanks for explaining this. I guess that "u" & "i" are both weak vowels but "u” is the weakest. Another word with this dipthong is "fui". I always assumed that "fui" had an accent mark over the "i" :-) – osweetman Feb 18 at 16:12
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As in the previous response, I agree that there are no exceptions to this rule; however some rules take precedence over other ones. E.g. if the word does not end in vowel, n or s, but there is a diphthong in the last syllable that needs to be broken, then it is stressed.

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