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The Correos of Spain sent me a message

Envío en reparto para su entrega

Dictionary gives:

  • envío act of sending, a sent thing, I deliver SD
  • reparto I distribute (first person present of repartir) SD
  • entrega act of delivery, a thing delivered SD

Google Translate unhelpfully gives "Delivery in delivery for delivery".

From the context I it's pretty clear it means the goods are on the van heading to my house, not on a truck from one post office to another. But I'd like to understand the syntax exactly -- what parts of speech are all the fragments?

My best guess is that in this context envío noun "sent thing", en reparto "in distribution", entrega noun "act of delivery".

Literally something like:

  • Consignment in distribution for (formal)your delivery

Which would be better in English as something like:

  • Consignment sent for delivery

Could someone help me understand it exactly?

  • 2
    I would go with, "Package out for delivery." – aris Dec 20 '19 at 22:33
  • Thanks for quoting the dictionary definitions, and welcome to the sigh, jonathanjo! Note that it's even more helpful if the question includes a link to the specific dictionary definition you're quoting. – aparente001 Dec 21 '19 at 1:49
  • 1
    @aparente001 thanks: added dictionary links. Thanks for edit too, though differences are definitely between, not among, so I put that back. – jonathanjo Dec 21 '19 at 20:00
  • *sigh = site (don't know how that happened!) – aparente001 Dec 21 '19 at 22:28
  • 1
    This is helpful. For envío you want def. 2. Notice that def. 2 shows an article, whereas in def. 2, the word is used without an article. The message you received does have an article. For reparto you also need def. 2. That is a noun and the example fits your context. ("En reparto" is a prepositional phrase. We know this because "en" is a preposition. So it wouldn't make sense for "reparto" to be a conjugated verb such as "I distribute.") For entrega it could be def. 1 or 2. – aparente001 Dec 21 '19 at 22:41
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First, note that for reparto, we want definition 2, "delivery," because the example provided ("No contamos con reparto gratuito") fits your context and because "en reparto" is a prepositional phrase. We know this because "en" is a preposition. So it wouldn't make sense for "reparto" to be a conjugated verb such as "I distribute."

Next, note that this phrase isn't a complete sentence. It's a fragment. Here is one possible interpretation:

[Hay un] envío [que está] en reparto para su entrega.

An equivalent to this very compact fragment might be:

Hay un envío que está en reparto, listo para su entrega."

Or something like that.

Post office speak is a bit special.

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2

You got the correct meaning.

"Envío", as you say, is in the sentence a noun and it represents the thing being sent.

"En reparto" is explaining the status of the thing (In the act of being distributed).

"Para su entrega": I think the best option is the second one you mention, for delivery. Take into account that "su" doesn't refer to you but the package (for its delivery).

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  • If I receive such a message, will it mean that the package will be delivered to my home address, or am I supposed to go to the post office to pick it up? – aparente001 Dec 21 '19 at 22:32
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The dictionary and you are in the right track. "Envio" in this context means a sent thing. You can say "Alguien te mando un envio", in English: "Someone sent you a consignment/package". "en reparto" means "in distribution". Finally "para su entrega" does not translate as "for your delivery", but rather "for its delivery". So your translation was close, but if we were to translate literally it would be:

Consignment in distribution for its delivery.

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  • If I receive such a message, will it mean that the package will be delivered to my home address, or am I supposed to go to the post office to pick it up? – aparente001 Dec 21 '19 at 22:32
  • 1
    It means it is being delivered to you. – alanfcm Dec 23 '19 at 15:37
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El proceso de distribución de correo tiene varias fases:

  1. Admisión (Admission). El envío ha tenido entrada en la oficina de correos de origen.
  2. Clasificación (Classification/sorting). El envío se está clasificando para dirigirlo hacia la ruta adecuada.
  3. Distribución (Distribution/in transit). El envío está en transito hacia la oficina de destino.
  4. Reparto (Ready for delivery). El envío ha llegado a la oficina local de destino y está en la fase final de distribución.
  5. Entrega (Delivered). El envío ha sido entregado al destinatario.

En cuanto a la frase original: Envío en reparto para su entrega su traducción correcta en inglés sería: Shipment in transit to final delivery.

Royal Mail indica "Ready for delivery" cuando el envío está en la oficina local para su entrega final, el resto del tiempo entre la admisión y la oficina local, indica "In transit"

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