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I have heard the following sentence in the Narcos TV series, which takes place in Colombia:

Un sicario apresado tras el asesinato de Lara Bonilla confesó que Pablo había dado el golpe.

The meaning I understood when I initially heard it is that Pablo himself hit Lara (eg with a rock or other hard object). As Pablo Escobar didn't kill or hit Lara, I assume that "dar el golpe" can be used as synonym of "ordenar un asesinato" (= to order a hit/murder) ?

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    This sounds very reasonable to me. Linguee.com might be a source where you might verify this. You can give it a whole phrase. – aparente001 Dec 14 '19 at 4:40
  • General comment (broader than just this question): It would be an easier and more reliable process for you, the learner, and us, the helpers, if you used a print text as a basis for asking questions here. Subtitles are not in general a reliable way of checking one's understanding of a language one is learning. (That said, I think it's okay to ask about subtitles occasionally.) But I'm not a moderator -- that is just one person's opinion. Please feel free to bring this up in Meta. – aparente001 Dec 14 '19 at 16:34
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In principle "dar el golpe" does mean "to strike the blow, to hit". It can also figuratively mean "to make a move" (especially "to make an aggressive move"). In police chronicles you can find "dar un/el golpe" as a synonym for premeditated crimes, from a bloodless robbery to a massacre. If Pablo Escobar ordered someone to be killed, though, I would expect the sentence to read "Pablo ordenó dar el golpe".

Note that confesar doesn't imply truth. "Un sicario confesó que X" doesn't mean X is true, only that the sicario said so in a formal confession before the police. Normally you'd suggest this saying "Un sicario dijo en su confesión que X", but not necessarily.

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  • As this TV series uses "Pablo mató alguién" in other contexts for murders ordered by Pablo, I assume that the same figure of speech is used here to implicitly express that he killed the guy, even if he didn't do it himself. Regarding "confesar" not implying the truth, I'm aware of it, but the Narcos TV series makes it clear that Pablo was the one who ordered this hit. – Alan Evangelista Dec 18 '19 at 6:38

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