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Me pregunto si pero si tiene el mismo significado que aunque:

Pero si te vi hablar con las mexicanas, no hablas español.

Aunque te vi hablar con las mexicanas en el bar, no hablas español.

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    "Pero si te vi hablar etc." quiere decir "Pero yo te vi hablar con las mexicanas; tú no hablas español." No sé por qué alguien diría eso. "Tú no hablas español" no tiene mucho sentido en ese contexto.... ¿Quizás oíste algo mal? Nov 3 '19 at 7:31
  • The example sentences at spanishdict.com/translate/pero%20si show quite different usage of pero si than your example sentence, which sounds not in accordance with the dictionary definition. But I am not a native Spanish speaker, so let's wait for their reaction. Nov 3 '19 at 10:16
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    @HonzaZidek - I hope you'll write a question yourself and lay out the big difference you see. I don't see it but I'm not able to look at this topic with your eyes. What I see in these expressions that start with "Pero si" is an attitude of indignation about an apparent contradiction.... Nov 5 '19 at 6:27
  • @aparente001 The difference I see is that pero si expresses contradiction ("but...") with the previously expressed idea, whilst aunque expresses although, in spite of related to the idea which follows in the sentence. I cannot imagine a context where they might be possibly interchangable. No tengo ninguna duda aquí :) so I am not sure what question I should write myself. Nov 5 '19 at 7:12
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    It seems to me as simple as the difference in english between "but if..." and "even if..."
    – aris
    Nov 5 '19 at 21:13
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The only situation I can think of in which these two sentences would work:

Pero si te vi hablar con las mexicanas, no hablas español.

Aunque te vi hablar con las mexicanas en el bar, no hablas español.

could be that the person spoke with the Mexican girls in a language other than Spanish. In the first sentence, it could be the case that only the Mexican girls knew another language, so speaking with them showed that they communicated in another language. If he had talked with any of the other girls, who were only Spanish-speaking, then there was no doubt that he spoke in Spanish with them.

The first sentence could work with "hablas español" in the affirmative:

Pero si te vi hablar con las mexicanas, hablas español.

Suppose the person said:

A: No hablo nada de español.

B: Pero si te vi hablar con las mexicanas, hablas español. (However, if you spoke with the Mexican girls, then you speak Spanish.)

In a normal situation, the second sentence would work better with a small change:

  • Aunque te vi hablar con las mexicanas en el bar, no hablas buen español. (Although you spoke with the Mexican girls, your Spanish is not good.)
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  • Gustavson, eché un ojo al perfil del que pregunta, y sospecho que preferiría que se contestara en español. Nov 4 '19 at 3:53
  • @aparente001 Where is it in the profile? According to spanish.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic: "When answering a question, we encourage you to answer in the language of the question, if you are able." Nov 4 '19 at 8:33
  • I answered in English because somewhere I remember OP asked "How do you say that in English?" Also, with OP being in general unresponsive, I thought OP might prefer an answer in English to understand it better and give us a clue as to whether it was satisfactory or not.
    – Gustavson
    Nov 4 '19 at 12:51
  • @Gustavson - It is quite difficult to know what is helpful to this OP, agreed. My guess might be completely wrong. Nov 5 '19 at 3:57
  • @Gustavson - He may have requested a translation in order to make sure he understood, and was hesitating to ask what the equivalent would be in German. Nov 7 '19 at 6:20

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