1

I don’t understand what this means and how “en” and the past participle work together?

I’m guessing it’s something like “me traveling a lot”? The context was this video around 1:43.

Does “en” also carry the meaning of like “as” or “in the state of” here?

And could I get some other examples with this same structure? Thanks!

  • 3
    I think he might be saying "enviajado" as a single word. This'd be prepending en-, a prefix that can mean "inside ..." like in encorsetado - inside a corset, or ensueño - inside a dream; to viajar, which means to travel but can also refer to "the last" travel (he's dreaming of car accidents after all). So "yo enviajado" could mean "me in my last trip", i. e. dying. – walen Sep 6 '19 at 22:19
3

He seems to be saying, "Yo, enviajado." I have two ideas.

  1. Enviajado might be equivalent to sesgado. In architecture there is a type of slanted arch which can be called an arco enviajado or arco sesgado. Sesgado is kind of like "skewed." So, the speaker may have been talking in a self-deprecating way, saying that he might have had a lot of bad dreams due to being a bit screwed up, or off in the head.

  2. On the other hand, the English caption in the video says "high," and this seems plausible. Here's another example I found:

    Existen varias maneras de introducir esta sustancia: una de ellas es por vía oral, los efectos tardan en manifestarse entre 30 minutos y una hora y, según la dosis, pueden durar entre ocho y diez horas, cuando se coloca en el ojo la reacción se produce casi instantáneamente más o menos entre tres a nueve minutos, el efecto potente en el que se puede catalogar totalmente a la persona "ENVIAJADA" dura de una a dos horas

    Some documentation found by @guifa: 2008 scholarly article "ASPECTOS MORFOLÓGICOS Y CAMBIOS DE FORMA EN LA CREACIÓN LÉXICA DE LA JERGA ESTUDIANTIL" mentions that enviajado means estar drogado.

    So the translation would be:

    Maybe that was just me, tripping.

    Note, tripping can be literal (e.g. on an LSD trip) or figurative (in a weird space).

About the grammar: it's a sentence fragment. Here's another, following the same pattern:

  • Context: two people looking at family photos together Tú, disfrazado de payaso. ([This is] you, dressed up as a clown.)
  • Number 2 is most probably it. En-...-[a|i]do is extremely productive. – pablodf76 Sep 7 '19 at 13:45
  • @pablodf76 - I didn't understand your second sentence -- can you explain further? – aparente001 Sep 7 '19 at 16:11
  • 2
    Confirmado que significado drogado: revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/kanina/article/download/4113/3939 (es un PDF pero menciona que enviajar = estar drogado) – user0721090601 Sep 7 '19 at 20:19
  • 1
    Morphology (e.g. prefixes and suffixes) is "productive" when speakers can and do make new words with it. Coining en-X-ado from a root X is very common, so it's productive. – pablodf76 Sep 7 '19 at 21:36
0

Enviajarse is, according to the Diccionario de americanismos,

I. 1. intr. prnl. Ho. Hacer planes para un viaje próximo.
[To make plans for a future journey]

The speaker is asked about the meaning of his dreams and he just says that maybe they are premonitions, like he making a future journey.

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