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Someone and I were having a conversation where they told me that after one of their closest family members had died, they started experiencing something. It was something like,

Cuando se fayesio, me quiso dar fuerte en lugar de ponerme a llorar o gritar.

While I know most of that sentence, I don't understand what was meant by this. It literally sounds to me like

It wanted me to give force.
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    I can't be completely sure but "me dio fuerte" would translate as "it hit me hard" and can be used to talk about a feeling ans well as something physical ("me ha dado fuerte con ese videojuego" would mean that you are kind of addicted to the game). My understanding is that this person felt something very strong (probably sorrow) after someone passed away, but that didn't lead to crying or yelling (to have some sort of "cathartic" moment to move forward with the pain and sorrow). I guess that you have the original sentence, but since it's poor Spanish is difficult to know what they really meant – Diego Jul 27 '19 at 2:29
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    My guess would be that it has something to do with being strong, i.e. keeping a firm upper lip (not crying). – aparente001 Jul 27 '19 at 4:06
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    “Se fayesio” should be “se falleció” (fallecer). – Traveller Jul 27 '19 at 8:20
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    For the sentence to have complete sense, I would say that the original sentence could be "cuando él falleció, me dio por ser fuerte en lugar de ponerme a llorar". It would mean that against all odds that person was strong and did not start crying. – Charlie Jul 27 '19 at 8:46
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    I guess you tried to capture what you heard in the moment, so we should try to make minimal corrections. Maybe you inserted "se" assuming the verb would be reflexive, or maybe you got the rhythm right and it was "cuando me falleció". I think the reflexive assumption is more likely. For the next part, maybe it was "me quise hacer fuerte." All that leading up to "Cuando falleció, me quise hacer fuerte en lugar de ponerme a llorar o gritar." Translation, "When [the person] died / passed, I tried to be strong, instead of crying or shouting." Or "and hold off from crying or shouting." – aparente001 Jul 27 '19 at 14:15
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It can have various meanings depending on the context. In your example, it means that the person was about to have an emotional outburst that would lead to a public breakdown. Other contexts where this phrase is used are:

1- For a sickness or an external situation. VG1: 'La gripa me quiso dar fuerte' - 'The flu was about to hit me hard'

2- For the usage of force or combat. VG2: 'Mi oponente me quiso dar fuerte'-'My opponent wanted to strike/hit me hard'

3- For a description of enhancing something's qualities. VG3: 'El mesero me quiso dar fuerte el café' -'The waiter wanted to give me a strong coffee'

4- ... In a sexual context. in this case, giving it hard means in a vigorous way.

  • What's the subject of quiso? I find the sentence confusing because the subject of ponerme a llorar is yo, but that doesn't jive with quiso. – aparente001 Aug 8 '19 at 4:50
  • @aparente001 The subject is "la gripa". "quiso" is the third singular form of the past simple tense [Tercera persona del singular del preterito de indicativo]. – RubioRic Aug 8 '19 at 6:20
  • The subject for 'quizo' is either 'El/ella/eso/aquello' (he/she/it/it). – deags Aug 8 '19 at 15:29
  • @RubioRic and deags - I do understand the conjugation. I don't understand what's going on the sentence OP asked about (Cuando se falleció etc.). What's the subject there of quiso? – aparente001 Aug 8 '19 at 21:20
  • @ aparente001 As I say, the subjhect is El/ella/eso/aquello' (he/she/it/it). As in ' El quiso, ella quiso, eso quiso, aquella quiso. VG: El se quiso aguantar las ganas de llorar de tanta emoción.' (He wanted to restrain himself the desire for crying from so much emotion) VG2- 'Ella quiso decir...' (she meant to say). – deags Aug 9 '19 at 15:43
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As a Spanish speaker, I would interpret that as:

"He/she wanted to hit me hard."

"Dar" in Spanish generally means "to give", but as a colloquialism it can be used to mean "to hit". As in:

Te voy a dar con el bate. ↔ I'm going to hit you with the bat.

In review of the original context, which I had not seen before, (not sure why) the sentence does not really make a lot of sense to me. I have the following 2 guesses. 1) The sentence is poorly written (the grammar, for once, hints at this.) It meant to say something like "Cuando falleció, me quise dar fuerte en lugar de ponerme a llorar o gritar." Meaning: "When he/she passed away, I wanted hit myself hard instead of crying or screaming."

2) "When heshe passed away, heshe wanted to hit me hard instead of making me cry or scream." This one is the least likely of the two in my opinion. It might be in reference to how the passing character aimed to hit someone else with his/her last breath. If I had to guess, I would interpret it as per my first guess. Then again, the original context sentence structure does not make a lot of sense to me as a Spanish speaker. And it does not even sound like it is due to more formal, archaic or dialectic interpretation. It just sounds weird.

Cheers! Arty

  • This seems to make sense, but then, looking back at the original context, I don't feel so sure. How does this fit with the situation (alguien falleció, la persona afectada trató de no llorar)? – aparente001 Aug 6 '19 at 0:58
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    You know, that is a really good question. In review of the original context, which I had not seen before, (not sure why) the sentence does not really make a lot of sense to me. Which is probably why you are not feeling sure about how my answer fits in with the context. I have the following 2 guesses. 1) The sentence is poorly written (the grammar, for once, hints at this.) It meant to say something like "Cuando falleció, me quise dar fuerte en lugar de ponerme a llorar o gritar." Meaning: "When he/she passed away, I wanted hit myself hard instead of crying or screaming." – Arty Stable Aug 7 '19 at 14:48
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    2) "When he/she passed away, he/she wanted to hit me hard instead of making me cry or scream." This one is the least likely of the two in my opinion. It might be in reference to how the passing character aimed to hit someone else with his/her last breath. If I had to guess, I would interpret it as per my first guess. Then again, the original context sentence structure does not make a lot of sense to me as a Spanish speaker. And it does not even sound like it is due to more formal, archaic or dialectic interpretation. It just sounds weird. Cheers! Arty – Arty Stable Aug 7 '19 at 14:54
  • I think you need to edit your answer to include much more of the explanation you are now including in comments as our system is flagging this is low quality because of its length. – mdewey Aug 8 '19 at 8:06
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    @aparente001 Noted and addressed. Thanks! – Arty Stable Aug 12 '19 at 15:22

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