8

I only know "dar" in its literal sense of "to give".

And I know "conocer" in its literal sense of "to know" or "to get to know".

But in reading Cien años de soledad I came to this passage:

... y con un grande alboroto de pitos y timbales daban a conocer los nuevos inventos.

Literally "dar a conocer" would be "to give to know", which doesn't make much sense.

Not only do I not know what it means but I don't know how to parse it. Is "dar a" an idiom or set phrase? Or is "dar a conocer" an idiom or set phrase? Or is it some auxiliary usage of "dar" that I don't know about?

I've looked up both "dar" and "conocer" in my Gran Larouuse bilingual dictionary to no avail.

How should I parse and understand what's going on in "dar a conocer"?

11

I understand the difficulty.

Dar a conocer is actually an idiom or a figure of speech that is always interpreted as To make it known

This same figure can also be used as Dar a saber which has the same meaning.

So in this case the translation of your passage would be:

... y con un grande alboroto de pitos y timbales daban a conocer los nuevos inventos.

into

... and with great show and noise they made their new inventions known.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.