5

I'm finding it hard to understand this phrase

Por mí como si te mueres

What does it mean? What is the closest translation that makes sense in English? Also how do I form sentences of this form with the underlining meaning it conveys.

Some more examples are:

Por mí como si ataca a su madre ciega e impedida.

Por mí como si son del Club Coconut.

6

I comes to mean, "I don't care [about these details]" or "As far as I'm concerned, this is as if ...".

Although it may seem difficult to understand, you can try a with a literal translation

  • por mí → as far as I'm concerned

Por mí podemos ir al cine - As far as I'm concerned, we can go to the movies

  • como si → as if

Comía como si llevase un mes en ayunas - He was eating like he had been fasting a whole month.

So the expression

por mí como si

means

As far as I'm concerned [I care as little] as if ...

Check Origen de la expresion "me importa un ..." which explains why we often say "I care about this as much as I care for a cucumber", meaning, "I care about this as much as as I care about something of little [monetary] value".

The expression "por mí como si" means that you don't care about something brought to your attention, and you say "well, it could even be this other thing, but I care just the same: nothing". You compare with something to convey "I care as little as if" or "is as unimportant as if"

For example:

A wants B to pitty them, or maybe they are just joking ("Oh, poor me. My leg hurts. Please Carry me"). B comes to say "Your legs hurts? Too bad. I would not help/carry you even if you were dying"

A: Me duele mucho la pierna, ¿Me llevas en brazos?
B: No. Por mí como si te mueres. No pienso llevarte.

A claims that some guy (a famous rapper) is a jerk for the way they treat others. B claims that they don't care about it. They are a hardcore fan of the guy and would support them even if they were to beat their own blind and disabled mother.

A: Este tío es un impresentable. ¿Has visto cómo le habla a su mujer?
B: Por mí como si ataca a su madre ciega e impedida. Es mi rapero favorito y le apoyaré aunque dispare y mate al último unicornio vivo.

A says that they have very important customers and they have to be treated well. B claims that they don't care how important they are. The could be members of the Club Coconut, the royal family, or whatever else (Club Coconut sounds like they are mocking some important group or something).

A: Estos son clientes muy importantes. Son todos de la jet set. Hay que dejarles pasar.
B: Por mí como si son del Club Coconut. Acabo de fregar el suelo, y un suelo recién fregado no lo pisa NADIE.


por mí como si lo que sucedió ayer nunca hubiera pasado

This means, "as far as I'm concerned, I'm going to pretend that that thing of yesterday never happened".

  • Just want to be clear, will the underlining meaning above apply to this sentence ? por mí como si lo que sucedió ayer nunca hubiera pasado – kyonkopa Jan 7 at 6:12
  • Diego, I'm not sure how to proofread "I comes to mean." Is it: "This is roughly equivalent to"? – aparente001 Jan 7 at 15:09
  • Actually, I don't think you really mean "word for word" -- I think maybe you mean, let's break this up and look at two separate idioms and then put them together. – aparente001 Jan 7 at 15:10
  • 1
    This is an inspired answer. I think you could strengthen it though, by explaining what's going on in your examples -- make explicit what the relationship or contrast is between the A and B in the three pairs. – aparente001 Jan 7 at 15:15
  • @kyonkopa please let me know if the edits answer your questions and comment. I wrote my answer based on the original question, but since context and connotations are important I added the explanation of the examples, as suggested by Aparente001. Please let me know if it is more clear now. – Diego Jan 7 at 17:29

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