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I would like to know if "pedregoso" is appropriate for "rocky road" in below text, please help me to check it, thanks.

This leg of the path will be when people’s genuine stature is revealed as well as whether or not they have true faith. Since this leg of the path will be more arduous than any that has been led in the past, and it will be more of a rocky road than before, it is called “the last leg of the path.”

Translation for the last sentence:

Como esta etapa de la senda será más ardua que cualquier otra que se haya guiado en el pasado, y como será un camino más pedregoso que antes, se denomina “la última etapa de la senda”.

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    Welcome to Spanish Language! Could you explain the meaning of "rocky road" in the context of the text? What do you understand by "rocky road"? I just want to be sure as most of us are not native English speakers. – Charlie Dec 15 '17 at 14:06
  • Sorry, I have no idea with this situation. It means "full of frustrations" – Celia Talyn Dec 15 '17 at 14:14
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    @Charlie, the meaning of rocky road as "full of frustrations" it's a connotative meaning that things will get hard. so "camino pedregoso" , "camino arduo", have the same connotation of hardship. – Mike Dec 15 '17 at 16:43
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    I don't like "que se haya guiado". "que se haya tomado/seguido" would be a better choice. – Gustavson Dec 16 '17 at 2:08
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    I agree with @Gustavson - and would go a bit farther -- this is a mistake in the translation. "Guiar" just doesn't work here at all. // For rocky road I'd prefer el camino estará más accidentado que antes (got the idea from linguee.com). – aparente001 Dec 16 '17 at 22:00
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This translation can be considered correct:

Como esta etapa de la senda será más ardua que cualquier otra que se haya guiado en el pasado, y como será un camino más pedregoso que antes, se denomina “la última etapa de la senda”.

We get that rocky road is being used to describe the meaning that something is going to be hard as a rocky road, but not a rocky road itself.

This is connotative language, and it's transmitting an idea or feeling rather than a fact or a denotation.

in this context, camino pedregoso has the same meaning, yet, is very commonly used.

So an easy to understand and actually used form is camino arduo. And as the whole paragraph is talking about paths (caminos), then to keep the semantic of the phrase, then we will keep using forms that are related to paths.

So, while the translation is correct, it is better understood if we use more common, connotative words and phrases in Spanish like arduo/difícil/complicado/severo/, as these words are talking about feelings more like things (not explicit rocks as the use of explicit elements is less connotative in Spanish).

This translation can be considered accurate:

Como esta etapa de la senda será más ardua que cualquier otra que se haya guiado en el pasado, y como será un camino más arduo que antes, se denomina “la última etapa de la senda”.

Remember, there's no unique translation for connotative language.

  • "camino severo" is not a normal collocation. – Gustavson Dec 16 '17 at 2:10
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https://www.linguee.com/english-spanish/search?source=auto&query=rocky+road

Camino pedregoso seems to be the most common translation of this phrase, but others include (depending on the specific nuance desired):

  • arduo camino
  • incierto camino
  • camino tortuoso
  • accidentado camino
  • difícil camino
  • complicado camino
  • camino rocoso... etc
  • Most of the adjectives above will sound much better if placed after the noun, not before. I can't imagine anybody saying "accidentado camino" but "camino accidentado". Same thing happens with "incierto" and "complicado". – Gustavson Dec 16 '17 at 2:02

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