5

I can't understand why "fue" is being used with the present participle in the phrase "que se fue transmitiendo de generación en generación". Shouldn't it be "que se fue transmitido de generación en generación"? It seems that if a sense of ongoing action in the past is intended - and apparently it isn't - it should be "que se estaba transmitiendo de generación en generación". The context was: "Desde los años 70, los universitarios formados en España realizaron un gran esfuerzo para que el nivel de español se mantuviera en buena salud. También se fue transmitiendo de generación en generación, de padres a hijos."

  • 1
    Welcome to our forum. "se fue transmitido" is ungrammatical. It would be very useful if you could provide the context in which the correct clause "que se fue transmitiendo de generación en generación" appears. – Gustavson Oct 15 '17 at 2:09
8

(Please note that I've made up all of the examples below for you to understand the different meanings of "fue", so in particular the statements under (1) and the first one in the last pair of examples should obviously not be taken as true.)

I have to say your question is more difficult than it appears to be at first sight.

"fue" is a polysemic word in Spanish. It can be, always in the third person singular:

  1. the past tense of "ser" (to be), whether as a copula or as the auxiliary of the passive:

1.a. El español fue el idioma que más creció en la última década. (Spanish was the language that grew the most over the last decade.)

1.b. El español fue elegido como el idioma más popular el año pasado. (Spanish was selected as the most popular language last year.)

  1. the past tense of "ir" (to go) as a main verb

2.a. Fue a España a aprender español. (He went to Spain to learn Spanish.)

  1. the past tense of "ir" (to go) as part of a progressive verb phrase of the kind "ir(se) + V-ando/endo") to indicate (a) a gradual process, (b) the action of going away while doing something (with or without the pronominal particle "se"), and (c) a gradual process in the passive (with the pronominal particle "se"):

3.a. Fue aprendiendo español de a poco. (He came to learn Spanish little by little.)

3.b. (Se) Fue hablando en español. (He left/went away speaking in Spanish.)

3.c. El español se fue transmitiendo de generación en generación, de padres a hijos. (Spanish was gradually transmitted / gradually came down from one generation to another, from parents to children.)

"fue transmitido" would be used to mean "was transmitted", without any gradualness. "se fue transmitiendo" is passive (because of "se", not because of "fue") and, because of its use of "ir + V-ando/endo", it expresses a gradual process.

*"se fue transmitido" is grammatically wrong because it combines two passives, the one with "se" and the conventional passive with "ser" + participle, and this is not correct. You can say:

  • El español se transmitió de generación en generación, de padres a hijos.

OR

  • El español fue transmitido de generación en generación, de padres a hijos.

but NOT: * El español SE FUE transmitido de generación en generación, de padres a hijos.

Finally, the other structure you propose:

  • El español se estaba transmitiendo de generación en generación...

could be used as passive (because of "se") in the past progressive (because of "estaba + V-ando/endo"), but some other clause or an adverbial indicating duration would be required to complete the sense:

  • El español se estaba transmitiendo de generación en generación cuando, en algún momento, dejó de enseñarse. (Spanish was being transmitted from one generation to another when, at some time, it ceased to be taught.)
  • El español se estaba transmitiendo de generación en generación en aquellos tiempos. (Spanish was being transmitted from one generation to another in those days.)

Hope it helps. If not, please come back to us so we can clarify further.

| improve this answer | |
2

Consider:

Cuando salí de la casa, fui andando sin rumbo fijo.

"Fui andando" is an expressive, stylistic choice. I chose to stretch out my verb with extra syllables, to convey more evocatively the wandering nature of my walking.

Las canciones tradicionales se trasmiten de generación en generación

is a precise statement.

Las canciones tradicionales se van trasmitiendo de generación en generación

is more evocative of a gradual process. Here, again, I am stretching things out, in order to convey a feeling of perpetual, gradual motion.

Keep in mind that the "se" makes the verb passive. If someone is getting dress slowly, dragging it out:

El niño se fue desvistiendo lo más lento posible.

The verb is reflexive in this case. But the analysis is the same idea as above.

The difference is rather subtle and I'm not sure one would find this in a Spanish textbook. Great question!

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I suspect you meant to say that "se" makes the verb passive. – adb Oct 16 '17 at 15:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.