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The Valencian dish Paella traditionally (at least that's how I was taught it has to be done) is prepared by slightly allowing the rice to burn from the bottom, to a point where it gets quite dark. I have no clue how to spell it, but it is called something I would write down as "Chocaraet".

How, do you spell it correctly? Bonus question: What does it mean or where does that word come from?


El plato valenciano Paella tradicionalmente (al menos así es como me enseñaron que se tiene que hacer) se prepara permitiendo que el arroz se queme un poco por abajo, hasta un punto donde se vuelve bastante oscuro. No tengo ni idea de cómo se deletrea, pero se le llama algo que yo escribiría como "Chocaraet"

¿Cómo se deletrea correctamente? Pregunta bonus: ¿Qué significa o de dónde viene esa palabra?

  • @Flimzy: Thanks. However, my Spanish is so bad by now, I'd have had serious trouble formulating the above question in it (that's why I chose English, instead). – bitmask Mar 27 '12 at 22:47
  • English is perfectly acceptable :) – Flimzy Mar 27 '12 at 22:53
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The usual spelling is socarrat, and that is Valencian or Catalan rather than Spanish. It can be translated as lightly burnt or toasted.

The verb socarrar exists in Spanish; the participle is socarrado, and socarrat is the Valencian/Catalan literal equivalent.

  • Great answer, thanks. Btw. if I look at the spelling, have I always mispronounced it? Do you pronounce it with an e before the t? – bitmask Mar 27 '12 at 22:29
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    No you didn't mispronounce, just used a diminutive wich, by the way, is spelled "socarradet" and it's pronounced without the "t" (socarraet) in Valencia. – Laura Mar 28 '12 at 15:19
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    Sorry, without the "d" obviously – Laura Mar 28 '12 at 20:25
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Socarrar might be it, but some of us also use chocarrar, which sound a bit closer to what you wrote (to me at least).

-1

La palabra es "socarraet" y se pronuncia igual que está escrita, la acentuación al pronunciarla iría en la sílaba final "et". Otra forma de decirlo sería socarrat

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