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Someone once told me they were saying güero which sounds very different from what the Mexicans are saying.

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    The normal word is "gringo" which doesn't sound at all like what you've mentioned. fido, firo, güiro, güido, huiro, huido would be the words that might resemble what you have, but most don't exist as actual words (that I'm aware of, at least). Mar 5 '17 at 18:02
  • It is the word I hear when people refer to me. About 25 times more often than gringo, people say "whih doe". I probably hear this word more often than any other word in the dictionary. I could ask someone but they never know the real word. When I read written Spanish from ordinary local people commenting on local news the sentences are barely comparable to written Spanish. I use that as an excuse for myself when I can't understand what people are saying. Maybe it's güido? Mar 5 '17 at 21:35
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    If it's güido then I haven't a clue and we'll need to wait for a Mexican to help you. güiro can mean kid or country bumpkin in Guatemala and El Salvador respectively (otherwise it's a squash vine, its fruit, or an instrument made of it). huiro (often pronounced like güiro) can be a joint of marijuana, a type of alga, or a type of sweet cane. jiro can be a type of coloring for a rooster used in cockfighting. fiero can be used in many countries to mean ugly or to describe someone with chicken pox, yiro can be a prostitute in Arg, but means healthy and in good form in Mexico. Mar 5 '17 at 22:07
  • It might be something related to your ethnicity. Something more specific than "gringo". For example, the cast of the reality TV show Jersey Shore are sometimes called güidos, because they are Italian-Americans. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guido_(slang) Mar 5 '17 at 22:10
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    spanishdict.com/answers/143985/…
    – aris
    Mar 8 '17 at 0:05
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I'm from México and I've never heard the word güido, at least in central area and the south, maybe in the border is something different. If you are trying to referring a person from the U.S.A. the correct word said in Mexico is gringo, a very common slang to call someone of this country.

In Mexico, the word güero, has principally two meanings. The first one, (in a strict mode) is a term that denotes a blonde person. For instance, Kaley Cuoco is güera, and Brad Pitt is güero. The second meaning is an expression to call anyone, for instance:

  • What's up man? is the same to say in Spanish ¿Qué pasa güero?

For that, anyone in Mexico can be güero o güera, no matter of the color of their skin, you are just calling someone.

As you can see, there are not even similar, maybe you missunderstood, or hear someone that wasn't Mexican.

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  • Also, gûero|a is a pejorative adjective to call or describe a person with quite opposite to white skin color.
    – Idea W
    Jan 22 at 9:32
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Some more answers:

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Wedo http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/143985/how-do-you-spell-the-slang-word-for-white-guy-in-spanish-wedo https://thedialect.wordpress.com/2009/06/26/wedo/ https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/wedo-g%C3%BCero.47551/

Wedo’ was explained to me by my co-workers as ‘white skin guy’ and now, years later, I have determined that the proper spelling for it is güero with the dictionary definition being ‘blonde’ but used informally as ‘whitey’.

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Among my Spanish speaking co-workers (*12 hour shifts - metal plating production - we all work hard) they call me "Wedo" because I'm the only white person on my line that can uphold myself 6 days a week at the same pace as my Hispanic/Latin peers.

It's used as a term of endearment in my situation - but basically can mean a blonde non-white or fair skinned person of Hispanic/Latin decent. Or just white as others have stated. It really depends on the inflection of how one may be referred to when the word is used.

I love it because in my world it means I'm on the side of my peers, not some stale square saltine good ol' boy.

The way it was explained to me was that in this instance it carries the same connotation as "red" or "yellow" bone does in African American culture. If that helps as a reference.

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