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What would you call shaft in Spanish? It is a vertical air passage, it leads below the ground level.

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Suggestions: tiro, caja, canal, cubilote, mina, pozo.

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    I normally call it agujero del ascensor or agujero del aire...
    – fedorqui
    Oct 6, 2016 at 10:55
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    The definition of shaft says "an opening or passage straight down through the floors of a building", it does not mention anything about going below the ground level. Is it necessary for your purposes? If not, I think the translation is hueco (del ascensor, de ventilación).
    – Charlie
    Oct 6, 2016 at 11:39
  • Quick, personal opinion (undocumented, likely localized to Chile): ducto (most generic one, a little technical), shaft, túnel (esp. if it goes underground), tubo (esp. if narrow). Most times with its specific function attached, unless obvious: ducto de ventilación. Tiro would work if air flows naturally, caja is sometimes used (elevator only, I think), canal may be misleading, I've never heard cubilote used, mina is mine, pozo is a well or at least open ended at ground level.
    – Rafael
    Oct 6, 2016 at 12:00
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    Tiro is used when the purpose is ventilation. Caja is used for the elevator. Pozo is just a vertical hole in the ground usually to extract water. Mina is a tunnel for mineral extraction and it does not have to be vertical. So it depends on the use of the shaft it may be tiro, pozo or caja.
    – DGaleano
    Oct 6, 2016 at 19:55
  • In Spain we use : hueco del ascensor.
    – user11977
    Oct 28, 2016 at 20:45

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En el siguiente documento Ascensores o elevadores se define:

Caja: es el recinto o espacio que en un edificio o estructura, se destina para emplazar el ascensor. También se lo denomina hueco o pasadizo.

Otro nombre utilizado en dicho documento para describir el concepto es el de guía vertical.

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