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I'm looking for a Spanish word for the English stocker and to stock, in the sense of putting grocery items on a shelf so that they can be sold. That is:

Yo soy un [sustantivo] de abarrotes. Cada noche yo [verbo] los abarrotes en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión.

The options I've found don't seem suitable:

  • colocar
    • This seems to have a much broader usage
  • abastecer
    • This works for a different sense of the verb "to stock": that grocery store stocks organic milk, i.e., it supplies or provides organic milk to its customers. That's not the sense I'm looking for.
  • surtir
    • Also a sense of providing something to someone, not putting on a shelf.
  • surtirse de
    • Apparently a translation for "to stock up," that is, to buy a lot, but again not the sense of "to stock" that I am looking for.

I'm particularly interested in a word that would be suitable for use in Mexico.

  • I'm backing up DarkAjax with his answer of: Abastecedor/Surtidor In case of Mexican Spanish "reponedor" is too awkward and fairly not used. This is in the case of Mexico. Source: Raised in the North of Mexico (Baja California and Sonora), lived there for 26 years – Alfred Espinosa Apr 21 '16 at 19:23
7

From a mexican perspective, I'd think of the word surtir, followed by abastecer are the ones that sound more natural to me:

Yo soy un surtidor de abarrotes. Cada noche yo surto los abarrotes en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión.

Yo soy un abastecedor de abarrotes. Cada noche yo abastezco los abarrotes en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión.

11

The word you're looking for is reponedor.
Hence, your sentence becomes:

Yo soy un reponedor de abarrotes. Cada noche yo repongo los abarrotes en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión.


I just realised you wanted an expression suitable for Mexico. If my answer doesn't fulfil what's expected, I'll delete it.

  • 2
    I'm not mexican but a short google search finds several job offers for "reponedor con experiencia en grandes superficies" in mexican locations and mexican companies, so I guess this answer applies to Mexico. – DGaleano Apr 21 '16 at 18:54
  • +1. This is definitely a helpful answer, but from what I can tell surtir may be more prevalent in Mexico. Many thanks! – Nathaniel Apr 21 '16 at 20:59
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In Argentina.

  • "Repositor":

    Yo soy un repositor de góndola. Cada noche yo repongo las góndolas en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión.

  • "Repositor": stocker.

  • "Góndola": estante.

We call "depósito" the stocking place where products are stocked in boxes not to be seen by clients. And of course, sometimes we use Spanglish:

Yo soy un stockeador de depósito. Cada noche stockeo la mercadería que viene en el camión.

We use "stockear" to counting products.

  • 1
    +1 ... but "puaj" for stokear :). Anyway the supermarket industry use "repositor" in Argentina. But you can't say "yo repongo la góndola". Te correct noun is "Yo repongo la mercadería (que se ha vendido)" – Dr. belisarius Apr 22 '16 at 2:11
  • And "góndola" is "estantería" (not "estante") :D – Dr. belisarius Apr 22 '16 at 2:16
  • Mmm, an "estantería" is made of "estantes". But you are correct. – César Javier Mendoza Apr 22 '16 at 22:41
1

For Castillian Spanish, the correct translation would be:

Soy un reponedor. Cada noche repongo las estanterías en el supermercado. O sea, coloco en los estantes, con mucho cuidado, los productos que vienen en el camión.

NOTE: we don't use "abarrotes" nor "gondolas" to refer to shelves (estantes, estanterías)

1

Stockeo, stockear o stockeador, is a "spanglish" word and therefore, incorrect.

The correct translation would be "abastecer".

To stock shelves = "abastecer los anaqueles".

I stock shelves = "yo abastezco los anaqueles".

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