1

Is there a difference between "mítad" and "mitad" as the Spanish word for "half" in English?

I have seen it written with both the i and the í (with an accent) and was curious what the difference was, if any.

I see this from time to time on Twitter:

Volar a Nigeria y en mítad del camino sobrevolar este punto tiene su cosa...

Mítad de semana y con mucha energía

8

No, mítad does not exist as a word. It must be an error.

The pronunciation of the word "mitad" is done by stressing the "a". Thus, adding an accent to the "i" would make it sound differently, like a different word. And I have never heard this, neither does the DRAE mention another possibility.

So I think this is a mere typo that someone did when writing it.


Your comment mentions two sentences where you saw the word written this way. One of them I could find in Twitter:

Volar a Nigeria y en mítad del camino sobrevolar este punto tiene su cosa... source in Twitter

The user says "mítad del camino", meaning "half way". But, as I said above, this word does not have an accent, so it is only the user who made a typo.

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  • I see this from time to time on twitter. e.g., Volar a Nigeria y en mítad del camino sobrevolar este punto tiene su cosa... or Mítad de semana y con mucha energía – drshock Oct 18 '15 at 2:40
  • @drshock I found one of the sources. It is indeed a mistake and mitad without accent should be the answer. Edited my answer to reflect this. – fedorqui 'SO stop harming' Oct 18 '15 at 20:46
2

Mìtad doesn't exist as a word. It's a mistake. Just mitad that has the same meaning and is used in the same context as half.

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