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I use the phrase "let me know" all the time in English. For example:

  • Just let me know when you're free.
  • Could you let me know whether you can come tomorrow?
  • If you have any questions, just let me know.
  • Let me know what you think.
  • etc.

What options are there in Spanish for expressing "let me know," and how are they normally used?

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  • 1
    "let me know" usually means "tell me", so I would translate it as "dime" or "avisame" in most contexts. – Flimzy Jan 19 '12 at 18:02
  • @Filmzy yeah you're right, though "házmelo saber" is also a common for it – Javi Jan 19 '12 at 18:07
7

In general it could be translated as either avísame or házmelo saber. For example:

  • Just let me know when you're free. --> Avísame cuando estés libre.
  • Could you let me know whether you can come tomorrow? --> ¿Me podrías avisar si puedes venir mañana?
  • If you have any questions, just let me know. --> Si tienes alguna pregunta, házmelo saber or... avísame si tienes alguna pregunta or... si tienes alguna pregunta, avísame.
  • Let me know what you think. --> Hazme saber qué opinas or... avísame qué opinas.

Personally, I prefer avísame. It's more concise.

2
  • ¿Podría usted decirme cuál es la forma plural de "házmelo"? – user682 Apr 24 '12 at 16:51
  • @Phoenix Háznoslo. ¡Saludos! – Icarus Apr 24 '12 at 17:59
3

I must agree that avísame is more concise, but at the same time I think it's too imperative. What I mean is that it could be seen as rude since you are giving an order. I would use podrías avisarme instead because it's more passive. It's the exact same difference that exists between Tell me this and Could you tell me this?.

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