1

English

This past year in Spanish class my teacher taught that (conjugated) verbs cannot follow the prepositions antes de and después de, but infinitives can instead:

Antes de salir, Santiago recogió los aretes.

Meaning: Before he left, Santiago picked up the earrings.

Great! But problems may arise when there are multiple potential subjects in a sentence:

Antes de salir, Santiago recogió los aretes de su novia Maria y los dio a ella.

Meaning: Before he left, Santiago picked up his girlfriend's earrings and gave them to her. OR Before she left, Santiago picked up his girlfriend's earrings and gave them to her.

In order to distinguish who is leaving, I want use antes de as a conjunction so that I can rewrite the above sentence as so:

Antes de Maria salió, Santiago recogió los aretes de ella y los dio a ella.

Meaning: Before Maria left, Santiago picked up her earrings and gave them to her.

How can antes de (and después de) be used as conjunctions?

Thanks, Jacob


Español

El año pasado en la clase de español, mi maestra me enseñó que verbos (conjugados) no pueden seguir las preposiciones antes de y después de, pero los infinitivos pueden en vez:

Antes de salir, Santiago recogió los aretes.

Significado: Antes de la salida de Santiago, él recogió los aretes.

¡Bien! Pero hay problemas cuando unas personas serían el sujeto de la oración:

Antes de salir, Santiago recogió los aretes de su novia Maria y los dio a ella.

Significado: Antes de la salida de Santiago, él recogió los aretes de su novia y los dio a ella. O Antes de la salida de Maria, Santiago recogió los aretes de ella y los dio a ella.

Para distinguir quien sale, quiero usar antes de como una conjunción para que puedo reescribir la oración anterior como:

Antes de Maria salió, Santiago recogió los aretes de ella y los dio a ella.

Significado: Antes de la salida de Maria, Santiago recogió los aretes de ella y los dio a ella.

¿Cómo se usa antes de (y después de) como conjunciones?

Gracias, Jacobo

6

Easiest way is to simply explicitly state the subject of the infinitive as the default interpretation in phrases is always going to be the subject of the main clause:

Antes de salir María, Santiago recogió...

However, it's my experience that many people (including native speakers!) don't recognize you can do this, though the RAE goes into a good bit of discussion on it in their Gramática. This is analogous to the personal infinitive in Portuguese that is only visible with plural subjects and second person singular and often optional (when it's clear who the subject already is)

Antes de Maria sair, Santiago já recolheu...
Antes de sairmos (nós), Santiago já recolheu...

However, the way your teacher will probably want you to do it (and certainly the more elegant way if the phrase gets even moderately complex) is to use a noun phrase. Remember we need a noun, or something that functions as a noun, after prepositions. To do that, insert a que signally a new clause:

Antes de que...

Now you can have full use of subjects, objects, etc, as in any other sentence. In speech, a pause will signal the end of the clause, and in writing we use a comma:

Antes de que ... , Ignacio recogió...

I've left the ellipses in for a reason. When using certain phrases like antes de or después de, we often need the subjunctive. In this case, we do, so we get:

Antes de que saliese/saliera María, Ignacio recogió...

| improve this answer | |
  • What exact form of the subjunctive would be used in these sentences where I've used the preterit? – Jacob Jul 6 '15 at 22:24
  • Also, for the first way of stating the subject of the infinitive you listed, can one use subject pronouns as well as a proper nouns / names? (E.g. Antes de salir YO, ...) – Jacob Jul 7 '15 at 0:14
  • 1
    @Jacob you'll need a form of past subjunctive. You can also use pluperfect subjunctive (hubiese/ra salido) in many cases to reinforce the before-this-that ordering. – user0721090601 Jul 7 '15 at 3:19
  • 1
    And, yes, you can use personal pronouns, anything that can function as a subject could be used (even a noun clause, though that's rare) – user0721090601 Jul 7 '15 at 3:20
1

Ordenemos la oración en la que tienes dificultades.

  • "Antes de salir, Santiago recogió los aretes de su novia y se los dio a ella."

Sería más apropiado decir:

  • " Antes de salir, Santiago recogió los aretes de su novia y se los dio".

El "a ella" es una reiteración innecesaria porque se entiende que se los pasó a su novia.

Ahora, en esta oración el sujeto "Santiago" es quien hace la acción de "recoger los aretes y dárselos a su novia". En esta oración se está diciendo que quien va a salir es Santiago y no su novia. También se dice que es Santiago el sujeto quien hace la acción de recoger y entregar los aretes y "su novia" es el complemento indirecto, o sea, en quien recae la acción principal.

Si se quiere decir que es María quien sale, se debería cambiar la acción principal. Por ejemplo:

  • "Antes de salir, María recibió los aretes que recogió su novio Santiago". Si se cambia el orden de los sujetos, cambia el sentido, o sea, en esta nueva oración se entiende que es María quién sale y no Santiago.

El tema con estas oraciones es que tienen información inferida, o sea, dependiendo del orden de los sujetos en la oración es en quién recaen las acciones.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.