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Dec
11
comment ¿Se recurre a la retórica y otros recursos lingüísticos embellecedores con más frecuencia en español que en inglés?
BTW, el uso de mayúsculas para los nombres de idiomas es algo del inglés. No es un estilo correcto en castellano.
Dec
10
comment What is the ingredient “royal”?
Just remembered... The phenomenon I am refereing to is called brand dillution into a generic name.
Dec
10
comment What is the ingredient “royal”?
Yes. Royal is a very old US baking powder brand. It was introduced in Latin America as part of the economic expansion of the New Deal, it was already known before the start of World War II (as far as my family papers allow me to tell). The name of the brand replaced the name of the product in the people's language. It is the same phenomenon as has happened in US English with Kleenex for disposable tissues or Band-Aid for adhesive bandages.
Dec
9
comment ¿Cuál es el origen de la palabra 'antro'?
En México se le llama antro a cualquier sitio de vida nocturna, no solo a uno de mala reputación. Por eso escribí es un mejicanismo por extensión del significado...
Nov
29
comment “Soy yo el que vine…” or “soy yo el que vino…”?
Quien is the correct relative pronoun here because it refers to persons, while el que refers to objects and indeterminates.
Nov
25
comment Equivalente en idioma inglés de La Real Academia Española
@rraallvv ¡Buena pregunta! Es algo que se preguntan muchos, aún en las academias nacionales. En mi opinión, la RAE es un mal necesario para mantener nuestra cohesión cultural, más que la idiomática. Me explico: El ingĺés se mantiene coherente gracias a los medios masivos de comunicación (todos ven CNN). El alemán y el francés tienen una cohesión cultural inherente que el castellano no tiene. Sin algo como la RAE, la lengua entraría en deriva especialmente en América. Por ejemplo, la academia nacional de los E.E.U.U. ha hecho maravillas para impedir que el castellano allí se vuelva un "pidgin".
Nov
24
comment “ir a «infinitive»” vs. future tense
Please take notice that in the sentence No se si la casa estará terminada a tiempo what defines uncertainty is the fragment No se si. If you say La casa estará terminada a tiempo what you are effectively saying is The house shall be built on time. Also notice that the last two sentences do not transliterate but do translate.
Nov
24
comment ¿Cuándo usar “conseguir” o “lograr”?
@ErnestoMarrero Pues creo que si lo hice. :-) En castellano, conseguir y lograr son casi sinónimos de acuerdo al diccionario pero en cuanto al uso son diferentes, lo que se vé al obervar su uso de equivalencia con palabras inglesas que no son sinónimas. Y de otro lado, la frase idiomática inglesa no se traduce, ni significa, ninguna de esas palabras en castellano.
Oct
5
comment How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?
@jrdioko Here is the story: elmalpensante.com/… BTW, I personally have always found the definitions too off-the-mark. The emphasis on localisms ans rejection of the general consensus makes it almost useless for translation work; they just didn't think using the RAE's as a guideline was necessary.
Sep
29
comment Is it bad to address a young male as “señor”?
@Laura I'm a native speaker too. The point I'm trying to get across is that there is a big difference between dialect use and the general use style that one should recommend to the people that begin to learn the language. Only when you know a new language well enough and its cultural context will you have the skill to break the general rules. If you read Oir 4. in Dictionario Panhispánico de Dudas, you'll see what I mean. Of course, in some areas of America it is used with other meanings, but that doesn't make it the correct, general use case.
Sep
29
comment How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?
@jrdioko I am familiar with the site and the history of that particular dictionary. To make things short, it started as a great project for 7 years, then it was sold off to OUP where all the original linguists and lexicographers were fired and "reshaped by the staff to fit the editorial policy", read butchered, and made into a flop. If you really want to own a great English-Spanish dictionary, I can't praise enough the Appleton-Cuyas'; it is bit long in the tooth and probably out-of-print, but I always find myself coming back to my old copy.
Sep
25
comment How to respond to ¿Cómo estás?
Do note that @Icarus example is sarcastic. You may use it with a close friend, but in casual conversation it won't convey the meaning you might want.
Sep
25
comment Is it bad to address a young male as “señor”?
@laura even if it is common use, it is demeaning because it creates a Master/Servant relationship. We do not live in feudal nor colonial times anymore. BTW, I don't place this in the context of political correctness which I personally detest, but rather in the context of politeness and respect for others. Each language has its usage and form, from the extreme honorific hyperbole of Japanese and Mandarin to the very relaxed usage of English in the USA (the West Coast in particular). Spanish is not particularly over the top but most native speakers seem to have forgotten the basics.
Sep
25
comment How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?
@jrdioko Never believe anything you read in a random site on the Internet :-). WordReference is particularly bad when it comes to anything different to the English language in my experience. BTW, «fruto seco» is the educated term in peninsular Spanish; don't expect a contemporaneous native speaker from Spain to use that term naturally.
Sep
24
comment Is it bad to address a young male as “señor”?
"Oiga/Oye" and "Joven" (unless the man is under 20 and only if you are certain) is very bad form. It comes across as insulting or at least makes you look as someone of very low sociocultural origin. And were you in that person's neighborhood, you may not leave walking by yourself.
Sep
24
comment Translation of “Welcome back!”
@dusan done. Deleted the comment as well.
Sep
8
comment Tildes sobre las letras mayúsculas
Lo haría pero estoy corto de tiempo hoy :-) Seguiré tu consejo en las próximas ocasiones.