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Retired. Once a programmer, then a DBA.


Dec
13
comment How would you say “I'm done with this!” as in “I had enough”
Creo que es derivado de algo malsonante.
Dec
11
comment Why do fruits seemingly have two genders?
Christmas fruitcake contains both fruta seca and frutos secos.
Nov
26
comment How to say plural of abbreviations
Buenos Aires does not follow the rules for plurals, if you are talking about the capital city of Argentina. In that context, BA is a singular even if it doesn't look like one.
Nov
24
comment ¿Adjetivo para el invierno?
En inglés, la frase "vernal equinox" se refiere al comienzo de primavera. Viene del mismo origen.
Nov
19
comment How to correctly translate “Upload a track” from English?
Whether people do or do not make a careful distinction between cargar and descargar depends mostly on the habits of the speaker. As in English, with the distinction between download and upload. Some people "download" photos from their phone to their gallery, while others "upload" them.
Nov
19
comment Why isn't “good morning” “buenas mañanas”?
Because different languages are different. That's a stupid answer, but it's the truth.
Nov
19
comment Por qué el español se pronuncia como se escribe?
La diferencia entre lo que dice Diego y lo que dice @clinch se asemeja a la diferencia entre un homomorfismo y un isomorfismo. Esto es un poco abstracto, pero es la misma idea.
Nov
18
comment Is there an equivalent idiom for “Slow and steady wins the race”?
The one I heard was, "poco a poco se llega lejos". That's almost like one of the ones you posted.
Nov
12
comment Por qué el español se pronuncia como se escribe?
En lo de Wikipedia dicen lo siguiente "El primer intento de dotar de un código gráfico sistemático data del reinado de Alfonso X, que intentaría ajustar las diversas soluciones adoptadas por sus predecesores a un criterio fundamentalmente fonográfico."
Oct
24
comment Are there no gophers in Spain?
if a gopher is an almost unknown animal for the reader, it stands to reason that the noun for a gopher will be an almost unknown word.
Oct
23
comment Are there no gophers in Spain?
Better yet, go to the Wikipedia article on "Gopher" (by clicking on the link above), and then select "Español" from the language menu on the left. You'll get the corresponding Wikipedia article in Spanish. Lots of detail.
Oct
19
comment Are there no gophers in Spain?
doesn't "topo" mean "mole"?
Oct
17
comment Cómo decir la expresión «difficult cookie to crumble» en español
La frase difficult cookie no equivale a tough cookie. Significan la misma cosa, pero tough cookie presenta un juego de palabras que se pierde con difficult cookie
Oct
16
comment Cómo decir la expresión «difficult cookie to crumble» en español
De acuerdo con Diego. Viene de "That's the way the cookie crumbles". En este sentido, "tough cookie" tiene cierto valor humorístico, porque puede signicar una galleta difícil de masticar.
Oct
15
comment Why is “ser” and not “estar” used for expressing the current time?
Time is not mutable, even though it makes everything else mutable. But I'm with those who say it's best not to get too philosophical about word usages.
Sep
21
comment Preterite vs Imperfect with Poder
Add to this, the negative, no podía ir al cine, implies that no attempt was made.
Sep
21
comment imperative or subjunctive
The way I learned it, it was a subjunctive. But this was very elementary education (1st through 6th grades), in a Spanish speaking country. I didn't take courses in Spanish in high school or college, except for one course in Latin American literature. So I know how to speak, but I really don't know the grammar.
Sep
20
comment Is Spain the only country that uses “vosotros” for “you all”?
Throughout Latin America, the majority of Bibles use the vosotros form for the 2nd person plural. Almost everyone familiar with the Bible recognizes it, even if they don't use it.
Aug
8
comment ¿Existe alguna traducción adecuada para “Habemos” en inglés?
Cabe añadir que, en latin, la palabra "habemus" quiere decir "tenemos". Por ejemplo, "habemus papam". Esto puede dar lugar a que cierta gente insista en usar una forma incorrecta, porque suena a lo académico.
Aug
8
comment Why do Spanish words have gender?
did you mean "there be dragons"?