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Retired. Once a programmer, then a DBA.


Aug
8
comment Existe alguna traducción adecuada para “Habemos” en inglés
Cabe añadir que, en latin, la palabra "habemus" quiere decir "tenemos". Por ejemplo, "habemus papam". Esto puede dar lugar a que cierta gente insista en usar una forma incorrecta, porque suena a lo académico.
Aug
8
comment Why do Spanish words have gender?
did you mean "there be dragons"?
Aug
7
comment How should I pronounce Spanish single 'r' and 'l'?
As a sidebar, please note that "r" and "l" confusion is not limited to Asians. It's endemic. Note the way the country name, "Argelia" is written. Compare to the way the same country name is written in English or French.
Aug
5
comment Why is the sound of the alphabet “j” different in Spanish, English, German and French?
Thanks. It's also worth noting that the sound of the words "Mexico" and "Texas" in American English appear to be derived from the way an American would pronounce an equis, and not by listening to a Mexican saying those words.
Aug
5
answered Why is the sound of the alphabet “j” different in Spanish, English, German and French?
Aug
4
comment When does one replace “le/les” with the pronoun “se”?
I understand the objection to saying that "se" means "one". However, I think it's right to say that the reflexive construct often expresses, in Spanish, the same thing that, in Britain, the use of the impersonal pronoun "one" expresses. Note that the use of the impersonal "one" is unusual in the US, and would probably only be recognized by people who read some British writings. The impersonal "one" may be derived from the the French "on".
Aug
4
awarded  Yearling
Aug
3
answered “Bad” words in good phrases - how socially acceptable are they
Jul
30
comment usage of “su” (the pronoun)
Usted evolved from 'vuestra merced', which took the third person singular. And the verb forms still are identical to third person singular. The possesive pronoun likewise takes the third person singular form, 'su'.
Jul
26
awarded  Informed
Jul
26
comment Help me pronounce single “r”
What @Artefacto said, plus: A Word inicial "r" is pronounced like a trilled "rr". I can't think of any exceptions to this, off the top of my head.
Jul
25
comment Was referring to Jesus in this way considered blasphemy?
Whether it makes sense in English depends on the background of the reader. I'd say that the English used by the character in the novel is colloquial and maybe even slang. It's not part of my English, either, but I can intuit what the character is really saying. A Spanish reader, faced with a literal translation, would generally not be able to decipher the character's original intent.
Jul
23
answered “echado” vs “echando”
Jul
17
comment How to hispanizise (rather unknown) German toponyms with umlaut?
Sixty years ago, in Chile or Argentina, it was very funny to listen to Germans trying to speak Spanish. The same probably goes in reverse.
Jul
16
revised Where did using “un servidor” to address yourself come from? / De donde se origina la costumbre de llamerse a sí mismo “un servidor”?
added para about tag lines.
Jul
16
comment Many meanings of “llamas”
English is just a bad. How about "pine" the tree and "pine" the verb?
Jul
16
revised Where did using “un servidor” to address yourself come from? / De donde se origina la costumbre de llamerse a sí mismo “un servidor”?
typos
Jul
16
answered Where did using “un servidor” to address yourself come from? / De donde se origina la costumbre de llamerse a sí mismo “un servidor”?
Jul
11
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
11
awarded  Nice Answer