730 reputation
410
bio website blangblog.com
location Oakland, CA
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Dec 17 '13 at 20:01

I am an avid learner and user of the Spanish language. It was among my strongest subjects in school, and the primary reason for this was that I began to use it online when chatting with friends. I also used it enough in person to become fluent in a way exceeding the usual academic outcome in the US. I have an ongoing interest in languages and can speak several.


Nov
24
answered When is “mitad” appropriate?
Nov
23
awarded  Critic
Nov
23
revised What does “lo” in “(no) lo es” refer to?
Expanded on meaning of `lo`.
Nov
23
comment What does “lo” in “(no) lo es” refer to?
Yeah, I was trying to represent more spoken English, since I would never write anything like that. Even with a comma, it looks tacky. Edited to answer the part about lo.
Nov
23
answered What does “lo” in “(no) lo es” refer to?
Nov
23
comment Is there any subtle difference between the two forms of the imperfect subjuntive?
Edited thus. I'd say it applies to Mexican Spanish as well.
Nov
23
revised Is there any subtle difference between the two forms of the imperfect subjuntive?
Changed Central/South American Spanish to Latin American Spanish.
Nov
22
answered Is there any subtle difference between the two forms of the imperfect subjuntive?
Nov
22
comment How do I know whether to attach a direct object pronoun to the infinitive?
Outside of this article, I've never seen or heard a sentence like «Como si adivinara mi pensamiento, díjome al punto: “La verdad es desnuda”» (RBastos Vigilia [Par. 1992]) so that one must be particularly literary. I can also add that placing the direct object after the verb is most natural after questions (I asked a native speaker about this once). So ¿Quieres hacerlo? is better than ¿Lo quieres hacer? - although, that said, the latter sentence also looks natural but the meaning is more of confirming the wanting vs. asking if they want to do it at all.
Nov
22
comment What is the most idiomatic translation of “no way!”
Yes, I agree with that. Context matters.
Nov
22
awarded  Editor
Nov
22
revised Best translation of “just wanted to”
El acento no se requiere usar a menos que el significado no sería claro. http://buscon.rae.es/dpdI/SrvltGUIBusDPD?lema=tilde2#323
Nov
21
answered What is the most idiomatic translation of “no way!”
Nov
21
suggested suggested edit on Best translation of “just wanted to”
Nov
21
awarded  Teacher
Nov
21
answered When should you use the preterite or the imperfect to express past time?
Nov
16
comment How can I know if a word or phrase should be avoided due to regional variations?
@gumbo The Castilian pronunciation of z and c is definitely not neutral in most of the rest of the Spanish-speaking world.
Nov
16
awarded  Supporter
Nov
16
answered When to use ya and todavía