216 reputation
14
bio website racotecnic.com
location Barcelona, Spain
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Oct 7 at 9:21

Senior developer born in Barcelona.


Dec
1
revised Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?
Updated links
Mar
26
awarded  Autobiographer
Nov
21
comment “Toma un tiempo” o “lleva un tiempo”, ¿qué suena más natural?
Correcto, merci por el apunte :)
Nov
21
revised “Toma un tiempo” o “lleva un tiempo”, ¿qué suena más natural?
added 8 characters in body
Nov
19
answered “Toma un tiempo” o “lleva un tiempo”, ¿qué suena más natural?
Nov
15
awarded  Yearling
Apr
14
comment Do mi and mío have different connotations?
Another spanish here agreeing this answer. Maybe the sentence "es la casa mía" comes from a region of South America. But it sounds to me like Italian, not Spanish.
Dec
30
answered video vs. grabación
Nov
22
comment What does “sobadito” mean?
Sorry, when I said "where have you seen it" I wasn't referring to the country but rather to the business or whatever where you saw it (p. eg. a restaurant)
Nov
22
comment What does “sobadito” mean?
Where have you seen it?? Maybe it's the diminutive of '[sobao][1]', but it's a type of bread typical from Spain, so I'm not sure if 'sobadito' is referring to it. [1]: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sobao
Nov
20
awarded  Supporter
Nov
19
revised Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?
Replaced 'dawn' with 'dusk'. Sorry for the confusion :(
Nov
19
comment Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?
Sorry, I confused 'dawn' with dusk... :\
Nov
17
awarded  Editor
Nov
17
revised Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?
edited body
Nov
17
comment Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?
Sorry.. :p edited!
Nov
17
awarded  Teacher
Nov
17
answered Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?