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bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Tbilisi, Georgia
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Jul 2 at 0:40

I'm an Australian who learned Spanish in Mexico and has put it to use in Andorra, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Morocco, Nicaragua, Panama, and Spain. (Yeah I know Spanish isn't official in two or three of those countries but I ended up using it anyway at least some of the time.)

Sometimes people try to tell me I'm fluent but I'm definitely not.

I have a collection of monolingual and bilingual Spanish dictionaries that I've bought, many second hand, on my travels. I always look for a dictionary of regionalisms in each Spanish speaking country. I don't always find one.


May
3
comment Are there any differences between “de nada” and “por nada”?
I don't think "por nada" is used the same way in all Spanish-speaking countries. It certainly didn't mean "thanks for nothing" when I heard it. It would be good to know which places use which meanings though.
Jun
11
comment When to use “tratar de” and when to use “intentar” for “to try to”?
So what would give words their meaning other than how people use them?
May
29
comment Can I learn to roll my R's?
The Spanish single "r" is exactly like an intervocalic "d" in most English dialects (linguists call it an alveolar flap). In American English and some other dialects an intervocalic "t" is often pronounced exactly the same way, but for the rest of us there is a distinction (which linguists call "voicing") that makes "d" different from "t" in the same way that "b" is different from "p". Now the Spanish double "r" is made with the tongue in the same position but with a "trill". You probably trill your lips sometimes to express that you're cold. Now practice putting this all together (-:
Feb
10
comment How to avoid the lexical redundancy in the literal Spanish translation of “to ask a question”?
I'm going to delete the parts on translating "ask a matter" and "request a question" from this otherwise excellent answer because those don't even make sense in English. They were not translation problems like the others but illustrations of how word-for-word translations often don't work.
Oct
27
comment How prevalent is the phrase “qué padre”?
Thanks for the clarification @jachguate - I knew chévere meant both "cool" and "hot dog" depending on what country, but I guess it's too long since I've been to Guatemala now to remember it properly... I do remember a huevo being used in almost every sentence at the bar though (-:
Jun
15
comment How to say “Pick up”
@Junier: Don't worry, in linguistics, it pretty much seems to be an open question whether absolutely synonyms exist at all.
Jun
12
comment I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
This question has been re-asked on linguistics. I'd like to cross reference the two by linking: Searching for a Spanish word list for statistical analysis
Jun
10
comment I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
Sorry @Petruza I don't mean to pick on you, I'm just trying to help you find a way to ask a question on one of the SE sites that will have the best chance of getting a good answer. Some of the language sites believe their site should only be about speaking, writing, and comprehending the language and nothing else related to the language. And of course Stack Exchange has its own rules they want their beta sites to follow before they will allow them to graduate to full sites. These things make it hard for some people to find the right site and way to ask their question and that's unfortunate. ):
Jun
8
comment Should I use preterit or imperfect to express something that used to happen repeatedly?
I wonder is there ever a time to use soler in the preterite?
Jun
8
comment I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
Actually we've answered similar questions on linguistics.SE before. Tag it with resources and corpora. But do try and tell us how hard you looked so far and what you need it for, especially if computational linguistics is involved.
Jun
8
comment Proper spelling of “beisbol”
Mexico has the most Spanish speakers so they don't always do what the minority rule of the RAE tells them to do. It's pretty well-known that there are two Spanish variants for "football": fútbol and futbol, and in that case the RAE does accept both. The variation with "baseball" is obviously identical. How can a "proper" pronunciation of a loanword from English be dictated anyway. I'm sure the RAE will be edited to describe the actual situation as soon as they feel English borrowings for American sports are important enough.
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
@SergioRomero: In this way it could be quite comparable to the many Spanish speakers that feel compelled to write English in all capital letters at least in electronic communication. I suppose they do it when they write Spanish too. Fortunately nobody seems to do that here though (-: (PS it should be "You have just proven my point" or "You just proved my point".)
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
I think it's important that if you're including some accents you should include all accents. Leaving some out willy-nilly seems worse to me than leaving them all out. For instance if you wrote most accents but left out those in some peoples' names that would indeed look rude to me.
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
@SergioRomero: I don't understand then why you don't consider it's important to also write English properly in comments to this question. For instance, every properly written sentence in English must include a verb. Or maybe it's just a case that when asked some people feel writing properly is important, but in practice often write casually rather than properly.
Apr
16
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
@CesarGon: Of course. Just like many people would consider the final sentences of your previous two comments wrong English grammar for starting with a conjunction or preposition and lacking a verb. But in reality we really write like that all the time and it doesn't seriously impede anybody's reading. And after all the OP wasn't asking about grammatical or orthographical correctness but "importance". And I think the answers here cover all the aspects of importance, which of course include but are not limited to correctness.
Mar
27
comment Gusto variant of the verb gustar
@MichaelWolf, these things are up to personal taste, convenience, context, and subjective standards. For instance some might feel your comment would be less sloppy if you had put the term of address within the sentence or followed it with a comma instead of capitalizing the second word of your sentence.
Mar
4
comment Is “versus” a Spanish word?
Actually it could be that Latin never used it the way English uses it. The Spanish words verso and versar evolved from the Latin word but never had a sense like verus does in English or Spanish. Makes me wonder how English got to use versus in a way that Latin did not...
Mar
4
comment How to refer to a specific decade in Spanish? eg. the 1960's
You can translate "the '60s" as "los años sesenta" but on the net I also find "los sesentas".
Mar
4
comment What exactly are the “passive se” and “impersonal se”?
Spanish has reflexive verbs which English doesn't really have. In these cases "se" means "self" but it just isn't *translated as "self" in English because English won't use a reflexive verb most of the time. Such as "Lavarse las manos" is literally "Wash yourself the hands" but an idiomatic translation is "wash your hands". But English has some kinds of reflexive verbs. Such as "Sit yourself down" could be translated as "sentarse". Anyway this is why it's not a good idea generally to explain grammar points of language A via translations into language B.
Mar
4
comment Is “versus” a Spanish word?
So when in the evolution from Latin to Spanish did versus get dropped from the vocabulary? Or did it evolve into a Spanish word with a different form and meaning?