2,674 reputation
1230
bio website en.wiktionary.org/wiki/…
location Tbilisi, Georgia
age
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Jul 2 at 0:40

I'm an Australian who learned Spanish in Mexico and has put it to use in Andorra, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Morocco, Nicaragua, Panama, and Spain. (Yeah I know Spanish isn't official in two or three of those countries but I ended up using it anyway at least some of the time.)

Sometimes people try to tell me I'm fluent but I'm definitely not.

I have a collection of monolingual and bilingual Spanish dictionaries that I've bought, many second hand, on my travels. I always look for a dictionary of regionalisms in each Spanish speaking country. I don't always find one.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
2
accepted What Spanish term (or terms) work best to describe a glass jar as used for coffee, jam, etc?
Jul
2
revised What Spanish term (or terms) work best to describe a glass jar as used for coffee, jam, etc?
copyedit english usage; fix capitalization use italics to make language switching stand out
Jun
3
awarded  Popular Question
May
22
awarded  Popular Question
May
14
awarded  Guru
May
3
comment Are there any differences between “de nada” and “por nada”?
I don't think "por nada" is used the same way in all Spanish-speaking countries. It certainly didn't mean "thanks for nothing" when I heard it. It would be good to know which places use which meanings though.
Apr
14
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
15
awarded  Yearling
Jul
30
revised What are leísmo, loísmo, and laísmo?
edited tags
Jul
30
revised “Creerle” vs “Creerla”
edited tags
Jul
15
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
11
comment When to use “tratar de” and when to use “intentar” for “to try to”?
So what would give words their meaning other than how people use them?
May
29
comment Can I learn to roll my R's?
The Spanish single "r" is exactly like an intervocalic "d" in most English dialects (linguists call it an alveolar flap). In American English and some other dialects an intervocalic "t" is often pronounced exactly the same way, but for the rest of us there is a distinction (which linguists call "voicing") that makes "d" different from "t" in the same way that "b" is different from "p". Now the Spanish double "r" is made with the tongue in the same position but with a "trill". You probably trill your lips sometimes to express that you're cold. Now practice putting this all together (-:
Feb
10
awarded  Excavator
Feb
10
revised How to avoid the lexical redundancy in the literal Spanish translation of “to ask a question”?
remove the treatments of the non-problems as noted in my comment: http://spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/737/how-to-avoid-the-lexical-redundancy-in-the-literal-spanish-translation-of-to-as#comment5585_739
Feb
10
comment How to avoid the lexical redundancy in the literal Spanish translation of “to ask a question”?
I'm going to delete the parts on translating "ask a matter" and "request a question" from this otherwise excellent answer because those don't even make sense in English. They were not translation problems like the others but illustrations of how word-for-word translations often don't work.
Feb
10
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
4
revised Any difference between aquí and acá
italicize mentions; fixed a tiny bit of the english translation but more is needed
Feb
4
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Armpit: sobaco vs. axila