404 reputation
25
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location Spain
age 72
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen yesterday
Retired Brit living in Spain. Hoping the internet will keep my brain functioning for a while yet.

Feb
23
comment ¿De dónde proviene la palabra 'meacamas'?
Beaten by the Captcha :)
Feb
23
answered ¿De dónde proviene la palabra 'meacamas'?
Nov
19
comment ¿Qué significa “la tercera edad”?
y también : U3E | Centro de Estudios Universitarios para la Tercera Edad. (1a edad = juventud, 2a = adultez, 3a = vejez)
Sep
8
comment ¿Qué significa “tuanis”?
Try urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=tuanis
Jul
14
comment Género de derecha/o e izquierda
Thanks for edit JS
Jul
14
answered Género de derecha/o e izquierda
Jul
9
comment Sentences structure: garantizarse
Only #1 uses the reflexive form you specified in the question.
Jul
8
awarded  Commentator
Jul
8
comment ¿Cómo debo usar “?” al final de una pregunta citada?
Wikilengua suggests you could use both, but sometimes only one! wikilengua.org/index.php/Interrogaci%C3%B3n
Jul
8
comment Word usage: serme
Finger trouble with cut and paste! "Este año he decidido ser fiel a mí misma y no mentirme" As per your original sentence.
Jul
7
comment Word usage: serme
@ Cadenza : I can't find any examples of it being used either. But I can't see what else they could have meant. Was it from an old book? It certainly appears superfluous as "Este año he decidido ser fiel a mí mismo y no mentirme a mí misma." would mean the same.
Jul
7
comment Difference between “oeste” and “occidente”
I also see levante (E) and poniente (W) used to denote different parts of towns. (eastern Spain - Valencia region). Note that these are nouns whereas oeste / este can be used as adjectives western / eastern
Jul
7
answered Word usage: serme
Jun
23
awarded  Supporter
Jun
19
revised Uses of “se”: “se rompió” o “rompió”
spellling
Jun
18
comment Uses of “se”: “se rompió” o “rompió”
@Cadenza "Most of the glasses shattered (or broke)". Sorry, my layout could have been better. Not sure where you are, but here in Spain a cup is usually "taza". Wine glass with stem "copa". Ordinary glass "vasa".
Jun
18
awarded  Editor
Jun
18
revised Uses of “se”: “se rompió” o “rompió”
corrected spelling
Jun
16
answered Uses of “se”: “se rompió” o “rompió”
Jun
15
comment ¿Qué significa “salir del paso?”
Fox Lingo sugiere "muddle through"