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location Montreal, Canada
age 40
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 2 days ago

Jun
29
comment Difference between “salvo” and “salvado” (religion)
Technically no in this context or used this way. Allow me to elaborate. It would be correct if you are using it as (if I remember correctly the tense name is) present continuous as in: You are being saved from the clutches of sin / Eres salvado (or estas siendo salvado) de las garras del pecado. But, even though I am not 100% positive that it is grammatically incorrect, it sounds weird to say "Eres salvado" when you are trying to say "You are saved". Again remember that "salvo" is an adjective and "salvado" a verb.
Jun
22
comment ¿Qué palabra se usa para describir cuando un pago cubre hasta cierta fecha?
Si estuvieras haciendo la aplicación en inglés, cómo le llamarías a esa fecha?
Jun
22
comment ¿Qué palabra se usa para describir cuando un pago cubre hasta cierta fecha?
Si entiendo correctamente, en tu ejemplo, el nombre que necesitas es para el pago al 1-abr-2012? Por la aclaracion que pones en la respuesta de Sitmex, a partir del 1-abr-2012 tiene un nuevo ciclo de tres meses para poder recuperar la prenda?
Jun
21
comment What Spanish dialect is used for dubbing international films/shows?
What I have seen is that, usually, it is dubbed depending on the country it is going to be broadcasted. For DVDs it depends on the region. As an example, most Disney cartoon when you run them on your DVD player is going to ask you "Mexican Spanish, Argentinian Spanish, Neutral Spanish, English". My copies are region 4 (Latinamerica).
Jun
19
comment Pronouncing years in Spanish
Just for completeness' sake I will add that in Spanish there is no "shortcut" to say numbers larger than 1000. For example: 1200 can be "one thousand two hundred" or "twelve hundred". There is no such thing in Spanish. That number, as a year or as a number, will always be "mil doscientos".
Jun
15
comment ¿Qué significa “cdta” en una receta?
+1 just because I know how painful it can be to follow a recipe when you lack dominance of a language. In my case is English and I always need to have a dictionary by my side :)
Jun
15
comment ¿Qué significa “salir del paso?”
Even though I don't completely agree with the recommended English translation to the phrase, I think these definitions would be the most accurate.
Jun
14
comment How to say “Pick up”
@Albertus: what about "levantar"?
Jun
5
comment ¿Me pueden ayudar a deconstruir las siguientes oraciones? Can you help me deconstruct these sentences?
@JosiahSprague: I just finished reading the article. Maybe if you rephrase the question in such a way as to ask for why things are like that in Spanish. For example in the first sentence: "Es la manzana de John"/"Es de John la manzana"/"Es de John"/"De John es la manzana". They are all valid translations and you can see that the order of subject, verb, and object could vary and still be valid. This can make the approach the author of the article follows a little challenging. Hope this helps to get your question reopened.
Jun
4
comment Correct usage of debieras and deberías
@tchrist: I completely agree. Thanks.
May
30
comment Difference between “hay”, “ay” and “ahí”
@Flimzy: As a Mexican I can say that I have the theory that people do not write this correctly because of one of three reasons: lack of education, laziness or, they just do not care about writing it properly. IMHO.
May
29
comment How to decide between “ahora” and “ya” for the sense “now”?
As an example of "ahorita" imagine this dialog between a mom and a kid: Mom: Limpia tu cuarto ("Clean up your room"). Kid: Ahorita ("in a minute"). Mom: AHORITA!! ("RIGHT NOW!!"). So "ahorita" can be very confusing for a non-native speaker. You really need to know these subtleties and pay a lot of attention to the context in which it is being said.
May
24
comment Ways used to refer to another person?
In Mexico do not use Huevon to call your friends since it is a very rude way of saying the person is really lazy.
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
So true, I totally forgot about that one, it is also quite common in Mexico and I've also heard it in Argentina.
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
@JoulSauron: No, he is asking if there is a way WITHOUT USING A LONG PHRASE. So if there isn't the answer is No, there is no accurate translation. The only "sort of" way anybody has come with so far has been for colors.
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
-1 The question specifically asks for a way to translate the -ish without a long phrase like the ones you propose.
May
8
comment Is there an equivalent idiom for “Slow and steady wins the race”?
In Mexico is very common "Lento pero seguro" - "Slowly but surely".
May
2
comment What are some effective ways a foreign speaker can improve pronunciation in Spanish?
@jonsibley: Do not forget to read a lot. It may seem this has nothing to do with pronunciation but it does since you read to yourself in your mind.
May
2
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
@Flimzy: This is what is actually known as an anglicism. It means that we are "borrowing" a word from English but it is actually not correct. That is why nobody looks at you funny. That being said, as far as I can tell, there is no word in Spanish that would be an exact translation of "Shot" in this context, at least in Mexico.
May
2
comment “Fall in love with” (non-romantic)
Actually I am a native speaker and I use it like that all the time, as most people I know.