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location Montreal, Canada
age 40
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Jun 25 at 15:35

Sep
28
comment ¿Cuál es el diminutivo de mano, foto, moto, etc.?
Un pequeño "regionalismo". En México "manito" se usa más bien para referirse a alguien, por ejemplo "como estás manito?" En algunos círculos ese uso se puede considerar como de gente con un bajo nivel educativo. Por lo mismo si dices "manito" para referirte a la mano es probable que te vean raro o no te entiendan.
Sep
21
comment Translation of mild, medium, and hot (food spiciness)
Even though the answer you selected works for any Spanish speaking country bare in mind that you will hear different ways of referring to the same thing since this will depend a lot of the region/city/country.
Sep
21
comment Translation of mild, medium, and hot (food spiciness)
@DorothyHall: I would be careful with the use of this term since it might be (emphasis on "might") a "creation" of Mexicans living in the US. Another less likely possibility is that it may be used on a specific region of the country but I have never heard it, never in Mexico City where I'm from nor anywhere else and I did travel a lot within the country while I lived there.
Sep
19
comment Regional pronunciations of “LL”
@MichaelWolf: That's what I mean, to me both sounds in English are identical so most likely you are correct. Maybe the only way I could distinguish them would be by listening a native English speaker saying "juvia" and "yuvia" :)
Aug
16
comment What's the “ísimo” in the following words?
@GonzaloMedina: Very interesting when it says that these forms "fuertísimo, ciertísimo" are, and I quote "equally valid and more colloquial" and about how others, like "calientísimo" even though they are frowned upon in some educated circles it is commonly used and accepted, mainly in Latin American countries. Thanks!
Aug
16
comment What's the “ísimo” in the following words?
@GonzaloMedina: It is possible that you may have made a mistake. If I look for "fuertisimo" in RAE I get these results: lema.rae.es/drae/?val=fuertisimo which include "fortísimo, ma" and "certísimo, ma".
Aug
16
comment What's the “ísimo” in the following words?
@GonzaloMedina: I do not remember about "cierto" and "caliente" but for "fuerte" I believe the correct form is "fortísimo".
Aug
10
comment Translation: más famoso del cine
@Cadenza: No, because it seems that the one who has the licence to kill is "el cine", instead of "el espía". It is a very common mistake that even native speakers do.
Aug
9
comment Translation: más famoso del cine
@BorrajaX: I think the last one is more correct.
Aug
9
comment Translation: más famoso del cine
@Cadenza: You know, James Bond is a secret agent with a licence to kill. And HE is the most famous one in the movie industry.
Aug
2
comment Periférico de sonido en inglés?
@CesarGon: Granted, I will update the answer to reflect that.
Jul
24
comment ¿Es correcto decir “salir afuera”?
@Raykud: this link maestrosonline1.blogspot.ca/2009/06/vicios-del-lenguaje.html is quite long but if you look for the term "pleonasmo" you will see that it can be the useless repetition of a concept with synonyms. It does have some uses in literature and other contexts, even every day conversation, but it really depends on the context. Your example is one in which it should not be used.
Jul
23
comment Equivalent of Joe in spanish?
Very interesting question. Definitely Joe is short of Joseph which in Spanish is José. Could it be he just went by Joe because people just could not pronounce his name properly and it sounds more or less similar? Do you know where is your friend from?
Jul
20
comment “cursive” and “printed” writing
@BorrajaX: Good to know. Thanks!
Jul
20
comment How to say something is “annoying” in Spanish?
@Laura: Of course "irritante" could be used and it is correct but I do not think it is the best choice for this context for two reasons. IMHO "irritante" is something that is much more intense than annoying, something that I cannot stand anymore. Also, even though it is correct to say "Deja de irritarme" for "Stop annoying me" sounds funny and people (particularly teenagers) could make fun of whoever says that instead of stopping whatever they are doing.
Jul
10
comment Sentences structure: garantizarse
@Cadenza Any one of the three would be ok. They are all saying the same thing just slightly using different words.
Jul
9
comment ¿Qué significa 'va' en “Nos vemos después, ¿va?”
Sólo para complementar. Diferentes paises, o incluso regiones dentro de un mismo país, usan diferentes interjecciones para dar el mismo sentido a la frase. Por ejemplo, en México se usa "sale" o "va", es sumamente raro que alguien diga "vale" pero lo he escuchado y jamás he escuchado a alguien decir "te hace".
Jul
5
comment Las palabras definidas como genero ambiguo como “internet” ¿se deben utilizar con artículo femenino o masculino?
@Luke - Interesante, creo que tienes razón y también puede ser un término ambigüo. Sin embargo creo, y esa es solo mi opinión, que es más común decir "el mar", "la mar" se usa más bien en canciones y poesías.
Jul
3
comment Describing the common cold or flu in Spanish
@JoulSauron: Right! I forgot about "catarro", I'll update the answer to reflect that. Thank you.
Jun
29
comment Difference between “salvo” and “salvado” (religion)
@Javi - I have to disagree with you in that "salvo" IS used in religion. I do not know in Spain, but in Mexico both at services and in the Bible you can read "salvo" as a way to indicate that your sins have been forgiven so your soul has been saved.