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May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
@hippietrail: You've just proven my point. As English is my second language I'm sure I make grammar mistakes often, but at the very least I always make sure that every single word is spelled properly. Accents in Spanish are a matter of spelling.
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
As an example of how they DO matter, consider the following sentence: "Espero que su teléfono no haya cambiado porque se que se cambio de casa." In this case the two occurrences of the word "se" have different meanings that cannot be seen without the accent, the first one is "I know" and the second one is a pronoun, the sentence means "I hope his phone number hasn't changed because I know he moved." The correct way of spelling it would be "Espero que su teléfono no haya cambiado porque sé que se cambio de casa."
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
Even more importantly. It is a matter of writing properly.
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
I absolutely agree with Cesar.
May
1
comment accommodating (as in “Thanks for being so accommodating”)
@CesarGon: My mohter used it all the time, that's why I thought it was the most natural. We are from Mexico. I actually verified its existence in REA before posting: buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=acomedido
May
1
answered accommodating (as in “Thanks for being so accommodating”)
Apr
30
answered Are there any words that have opposite regional meanings?
Apr
30
awarded  Commentator
Apr
30
comment What is the most common way to answer the phone?
The origin of Mexico's "¿bueno?", which means "good?", is that when the phone first came to the country, the operator would always answer like that in an attempt to verify if the connection was good. To this day almost everybody still answers the phone like that in most parts of the country.
Apr
30
answered Learning programming in a Spanish speaking country
Apr
30
answered “s” final en tiempo pretérito indefinido: -aste(s), -iste(s)
Apr
30
comment Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
@Kage: Be careful with "pinche", it is a swearword. You could use "mentado/mentada" as in "¡Apaga la mentada televisión!"
Apr
30
comment Querer vs Amar & Adorar
@CesarGon: This may be the case in Spain, but it is totally wrong as a use of the word in Spanish. Every single couple I know from Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela, Chile, and Colombia use "te amo" because they feel a very strong kind of love between each other. Also "adorar" even though your example is accurate some people, especially very religious ones, use it exclusively in reference to God.
Apr
30
awarded  Critic
Apr
30
awarded  Editor
Apr
30
revised How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
I believe to say "cómo que grandes..." is not correct so I changed it to "qué tan grandes ..."
Apr
30
suggested approved edit on How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
Apr
30
answered Usar puntuación extra para expresar incredulidad
Apr
30
comment Forming a conditional clause in present and present tense
@gonnastop: Laura's example is dead on!!! It can also be used like that. It can be somewhat loosely translated as "When I get a million dollars I will buy..."
Apr
30
comment Forming a conditional clause in present and present tense
@gonnastop: For your second question. To say the phrase in present tense it would be something like: "Si tengo un millón de dólares, me compro una casa grande." This would be used in a "daydreaming" case :)