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location Montreal, Canada
age 40
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Oct 23 at 19:36

May
22
answered What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
May
11
answered Is there a difference between cilantro and culantro in Spanish?
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
So true, I totally forgot about that one, it is also quite common in Mexico and I've also heard it in Argentina.
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
@JoulSauron: No, he is asking if there is a way WITHOUT USING A LONG PHRASE. So if there isn't the answer is No, there is no accurate translation. The only "sort of" way anybody has come with so far has been for colors.
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
-1 The question specifically asks for a way to translate the -ish without a long phrase like the ones you propose.
May
8
comment Is there an equivalent idiom for “Slow and steady wins the race”?
In Mexico is very common "Lento pero seguro" - "Slowly but surely".
May
7
answered Complemento vs. Suplemento
May
7
answered Plurals of loan words
May
7
answered Distinguishing “quiz” and “test”
May
2
comment What are some effective ways a foreign speaker can improve pronunciation in Spanish?
@jonsibley: Do not forget to read a lot. It may seem this has nothing to do with pronunciation but it does since you read to yourself in your mind.
May
2
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
@Flimzy: This is what is actually known as an anglicism. It means that we are "borrowing" a word from English but it is actually not correct. That is why nobody looks at you funny. That being said, as far as I can tell, there is no word in Spanish that would be an exact translation of "Shot" in this context, at least in Mexico.
May
2
comment “Fall in love with” (non-romantic)
Actually I am a native speaker and I use it like that all the time, as most people I know.
May
2
comment How should I translate “he is a pain in the ass”?
In Mexico: Non swearing ways - "es un hígado", "es insoportable". Swearing ways - "es un mamón", "es un jodón". And as a side note, if you are in Mexico "Guevón" has a different meaning, is a very impolite way of saying that the person es extremely lazy.
May
2
comment How should I discuss my wife's due date?
Just to add some cultural context. In Mexico is very common that people say "Mi esposa se alivia el cuatro de junio." "Aliviarse" means "to get well" as in getting well from an illness. That being said is extremely common but, personally, I think that is very wrong because being pregnant is not an illness.
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
@hippietrail: You've just proven my point. As English is my second language I'm sure I make grammar mistakes often, but at the very least I always make sure that every single word is spelled properly. Accents in Spanish are a matter of spelling.
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
As an example of how they DO matter, consider the following sentence: "Espero que su teléfono no haya cambiado porque se que se cambio de casa." In this case the two occurrences of the word "se" have different meanings that cannot be seen without the accent, the first one is "I know" and the second one is a pronoun, the sentence means "I hope his phone number hasn't changed because I know he moved." The correct way of spelling it would be "Espero que su teléfono no haya cambiado porque sé que se cambio de casa."
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
Even more importantly. It is a matter of writing properly.
May
2
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
I absolutely agree with Cesar.
May
1
comment accommodating (as in “Thanks for being so accommodating”)
@CesarGon: My mohter used it all the time, that's why I thought it was the most natural. We are from Mexico. I actually verified its existence in REA before posting: buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=acomedido
May
1
answered accommodating (as in “Thanks for being so accommodating”)