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May
29
revised What is the preferred way of saying “I have to go”?
Added the Spanish translation to the question
May
29
asked Traduccion para “as far as I can tell” / Translation for “as far as I can tell”
May
29
suggested approved edit on What is the preferred way of saying “I have to go”?
May
29
revised Ironic constructions in Spanish
Added the Spanish translation to the question
May
29
suggested approved edit on Ironic constructions in Spanish
May
29
comment How to decide between “ahora” and “ya” for the sense “now”?
As an example of "ahorita" imagine this dialog between a mom and a kid: Mom: Limpia tu cuarto ("Clean up your room"). Kid: Ahorita ("in a minute"). Mom: AHORITA!! ("RIGHT NOW!!"). So "ahorita" can be very confusing for a non-native speaker. You really need to know these subtleties and pay a lot of attention to the context in which it is being said.
May
29
awarded  Quorum
May
28
revised Why does saber mean both “to know” and “to taste”?
Added the Spanish translation to the answer
May
28
suggested approved edit on Why does saber mean both “to know” and “to taste”?
May
28
revised Why does saber mean both “to know” and “to taste”?
Added the Spanish translation to the question
May
28
suggested approved edit on Why does saber mean both “to know” and “to taste”?
May
24
comment Ways used to refer to another person?
In Mexico do not use Huevon to call your friends since it is a very rude way of saying the person is really lazy.
May
24
answered Ways used to refer to another person?
May
23
answered What is the most universal way to say “keep the change”?
May
22
answered What's the difference between “vamos” and “vámonos”?
May
11
answered Is there a difference between cilantro and culantro in Spanish?
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
So true, I totally forgot about that one, it is also quite common in Mexico and I've also heard it in Argentina.
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
@JoulSauron: No, he is asking if there is a way WITHOUT USING A LONG PHRASE. So if there isn't the answer is No, there is no accurate translation. The only "sort of" way anybody has come with so far has been for colors.
May
9
comment Is there a Spanish equivalent to “-ish”?
-1 The question specifically asks for a way to translate the -ish without a long phrase like the ones you propose.
May
8
comment Is there an equivalent idiom for “Slow and steady wins the race”?
In Mexico is very common "Lento pero seguro" - "Slowly but surely".