Reputation
2,761
Top tag
Next privilege 3,500 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
5 18
Newest
 Custodian
Impact
~260k people reached

Apr
30
comment Querer vs Amar & Adorar
@CesarGon: This may be the case in Spain, but it is totally wrong as a use of the word in Spanish. Every single couple I know from Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela, Chile, and Colombia use "te amo" because they feel a very strong kind of love between each other. Also "adorar" even though your example is accurate some people, especially very religious ones, use it exclusively in reference to God.
Apr
30
awarded  Critic
Apr
30
awarded  Editor
Apr
30
revised How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
I believe to say "cómo que grandes..." is not correct so I changed it to "qué tan grandes ..."
Apr
30
suggested approved edit on How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
Apr
30
answered Usar puntuación extra para expresar incredulidad
Apr
30
comment Forming a conditional clause in present and present tense
@gonnastop: Laura's example is dead on!!! It can also be used like that. It can be somewhat loosely translated as "When I get a million dollars I will buy..."
Apr
30
comment Forming a conditional clause in present and present tense
@gonnastop: For your second question. To say the phrase in present tense it would be something like: "Si tengo un millón de dólares, me compro una casa grande." This would be used in a "daydreaming" case :)
Apr
30
comment Forming a conditional clause in present and present tense
@gonnastop: For your first question imagine the following dialog: Per1 - "Wow, a million dollars!! You're a multimillionaire." Per2 - "The fact that I have ....". In Spanish: Per1 - "Wow, un millón de dólares!! Eres un multimillonario." Per2 - "Que tenga un ....."
Apr
30
answered “True” meaning of “por cierto”
Apr
30
awarded  Supporter
Apr
30
answered Forming a conditional clause in present and present tense
Apr
28
comment Translation of “so close”
@JuanPabloCalifano: We are actually talking about the same thing. When I say "nomás" means "nada más" I mean that it is as saying "solamente", in this context you can say that they are synonyms or something like a synonym phrase. I do not mean the literal translation which would be "nothing more". I am sure it is used in other countries since now days every language and form of language take words from other places. Regarding the origin, I can only say what it says in the link I referenced which is from the Academy of The Spanish Language.
Apr
27
comment Translation of “so close”
@JuanPabloCalifano: Hi. First and foremost I acknowledge and accept my mistake. On the other hand you are only partially right, it does mean "no más" but it IS originally slang from the Meridional American countries (Mexico, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Honduras" which later because of its extended use in those countries was accepted by the Academy of The Spanish Language as a word. On the other hand by the context of Alfredo's example, it CAN be used to mean "nada más". buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=nomas
Apr
26
awarded  Teacher
Apr
26
answered Ironic constructions in Spanish
Apr
26
comment Translation of “so close”
Actually "nomás" is Mexican slang to create a contraction of "nada más".
Apr
26
answered No supo la respuesta
Apr
26
comment No supo la respuesta
Actually in the last example if you say it in the third person "No supo su nombre" it could very well be translated as "He didn't know his/her name".