688 reputation
59
bio website serabe.com
location Madrid, Spain
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jul 27 at 1:18

Not too much to say. I love programming, as much as you do.

@Serabe

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Jun
25
comment Origin and usage of “¿” and “¡”
@guifa please, read the Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas, interrogación y exclamación (signos de), point 3.b where it states that: "Cuando el sentido de una oración es interrogativo y exclamativo a la vez, pueden combinarse ambos signos, abriendo con el de exclamación y cerrando con el de interrogación, o viceversa: ¡Cómo te has atrevido? / ¿Cómo te has atrevido!; o, preferiblemente, abriendo y cerrando con los dos signos a la vez: ¿¡Qué estás diciendo!? / ¡¿Qué estás diciendo?!"
Nov
21
comment When should I use the pure passive voice in Spanish? ( fue/fueron [past participle] )
Castillian, Spanish Spanish.
Nov
17
comment How widespread was (or is) the phrase “La mamá de Tarzán”?
Never heard of it (Spain)
Nov
17
comment How do I know whether to attach a direct object pronoun to the infinitive?
I don't dare to give you a proper answer, but mostly they can be used both. When they sound strange one way, is quite likely in a case per case reason.
Nov
17
comment Why should we use estar over ser for being old or fat?
Have you heard about diets?
Nov
17
comment Why is the “X” in México and Texas pronunced as the letter “J”?
Xavier is pronounced Shavier, not Javier.
Nov
17
comment Proper spelling of “beisbol”
Quick comment. Never seen handball used in Spain, quite likely because, unlike fútbol or béisbol that are pronounced the same way, we use balonmano for handball.
Nov
16
comment When should I use the word 'yo' in a sentence where the verb conjugation already shows that I am the subject?
With comer, dativo ético is often used, quite rare to use comer without it (at least in Spain). For example, instead of "Él comió una naranja" "Se comió una naranja". Don't ask why, it is just that way.
Nov
16
comment When should I use the word 'yo' in a sentence where the verb conjugation already shows that I am the subject?
Yo no comí nada btw. Double negative, I know...
Nov
16
comment When should I use the word 'yo' in a sentence where the verb conjugation already shows that I am the subject?
In Comería una manzana dativo ético is often used: Me comería una manzana
Nov
15
comment Common Spanglish Words
If sometime you decide to learn it, remember that sicuramente (Italian) means 100% sure while seguramente (Spanish) means that something is quite likely but not 100% sure. If you are 100% sure, you use something like por supuesto.
Nov
15
comment Common Spanglish Words
Are you italian or speak Italian?
Nov
15
comment How should I translate “he is a pain in the ass”?
Not that much, quite uncommon for people and barely used. But would be understood without difficulty.
Nov
15
comment How should I translate “he is a pain in the ass”?
Quick comment: Es una china en el zapato. China also means small stone.
Nov
15
comment Is there a translation for “He thumbed his nose at them”?
Can you add a complete context for the idiom? I guess I understand its meaning but I need a context for translation.
Nov
15
comment How prevalent is the phrase “qué padre”?
I don't think that would happen in Spain. I guess I could guess its meaning, but not proper understanding of it.
Nov
15
comment How to translate “I can't wait…”
Sounds very strange for me (Madrid, Spain).
Nov
15
comment How to translate “I can't wait…”
Which country are you or your Spanish from? I wouldn't use neither of them but the first, but moving ya from the beginning to the end.
Nov
15
comment How to translate “I can't wait…”
Madrid, Spain. Sounds good "No puedo esperar a/para ver la película." "Estoy ansioso por" sounds great too.