4,471 reputation
823
bio website hjg.com.ar
location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 47
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 2 hours ago

Oct
18
comment Usos de la palabra “papichulo”
Jamás la había oído, ignoro su significado (Argentina). Sí conozco "chulo" (aunque aquí no se usa), así que, de tener que adivinar el significado, apuntaría por ahí.
Oct
16
comment What is the best translation for “Slice” as in “I ate two slices of cake.”
"pedazo" formal? I don't think so.
Oct
3
comment ¿Por qué Buenos Aires se abrevia Bs. As. o B.A. y no BB.AA. como debería ser?
En mi experiencia B.A. como abreviatura de Buenos Aires es bastante común.
Oct
2
comment ¿En qué países la palabra “coger” tiene connotaciones sexuales?
Aclaro que incluso en Argentina (donde la palabra se usa sólo en la acepción sexual) la gente entiende que en España (al menos) quiere decir otra "agarrar", y no sorprende ni escandaliza escuchar la palabra en boca de españoles (o, en general, extranjeros). Lo mismo con "concha" y otras.
Oct
1
comment How can I translate/describe a “rough idle” to the mechanic?
No es palabra usual en Argentina.
Sep
16
comment Is Spain the only country that uses “vosotros” for “you all”?
@guifa I fixed that
Sep
14
comment Best ways to say “on short notice”?
All sound ok to me (Argentina). Instead of "antelación" we also use "anticipación".
Aug
22
comment Why is “El agua poco profunda” feminin?
@syrux : the article 'el' is also used for feminine nouns, if they start with a stressed 'a'. Other examples: 'el alma' , 'el hacha', 'el arma'. All these are feminine, despite the masculine article.
Aug
21
comment “Fine line between” in Spanish?
"... would be wrong. You'd be saying that the difference is negligible." But that's what the "there's a fine line" idiom means! idioms.thefreedictionary.com/there+is+a+fine+line+between
Aug
21
comment “Fine line between” in Spanish?
I don't quite agree. "Hay una sutil differencia" emphasizes the difference, "there's a fine line" emphasizes the proximity.
Aug
19
comment What's the position of my tongue when I speak Spanish 'd'?
I don't really agree. The difference between the two first 'd' sounds you mention so subtle that most spanish speakers (myself included) are not aware of its existence. In any case, the first case is not as explosive as the Enlish 'd', and the second case never as smooth. And -above all- it's never pronounced sticking the tongue between/outside the teeth as in the "the".
Jul
17
comment Words with common roots English and Spanish
Lots. Even the title has one ("common")
Jul
14
comment “Maria Llena Eres de Gracia” in English
"María, llena de gracia" = "Mary, full of grace" "(María), llena eres de gracia" = "(Mary), you are full of grace"
Jun
16
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@Flimzy : Fair point. But, apart from being very rare, I'd say that it's actually the common sound 'cs', of which the 'c' is ommited because it's almost impossible to pronounce. Similar to the 'ps' prefix in 'psicología'
Jun
12
comment Translation of “can”
Alteratives to "no tienes permitido": "no te está permitido" "no se te permite"
Jun
11
comment “A menudo” vs “frecuentemente”
Same in Argentina. BTW, the question asks about "a menudo" vs "frecuentemente".
Apr
23
comment Mixing tenses in subjunctive?
+1 The negation of "Creo que Juan murió" are either (not equivalently) "No creo que Juan haya muerto" or "Creo que Juan no murió". But "No creo que Juan murió" would be wrong. See for example: forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=222263
Mar
12
comment ¿Cuál es el verbo para “party” en español?
@ArthurChamz He/she would still ask: "¿Qué se festeja?" ("What is the celebration about?"). I'd call that a misunderstanding.
Mar
12
comment ¿Cuál es el verbo para “party” en español?
> Would anyone misunderstand if you said "Quiero festejar"? Here (Argentina) it would sound wrong; nobody would use that in that sense; and everybody would spontaneously ask: "¿Festejar qué?". The young people just say "salir".
Mar
12
comment ¿Cuál es el verbo para “party” en español?
I don't agree. The first meanings of "festejar" are "Celebrar algo con fiestas" and "Hacer festejos en obsequio de alguien"; in both cases, the emphasis is on the "something" that's celebrated, or in the someone that receives the celebration; at least in Argentina (and, I suspect, in many other places) the word is used in those senses. To mean "I want to party tonight" we'd never say "Quiero festejar" but "Quiero ir/salir de fiesta".