4,254 reputation
721
bio website hjg.com.ar
location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 47
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen yesterday

Jan
23
answered Translation of “how often” questions
Jan
23
answered Translation of “take your time”
Jan
23
revised Translation of “settling in”
added 25 characters in body
Jan
23
revised Translation of “settling in”
added 12 characters in body
Jan
23
answered Translation of “It will be a while before/until…”
Jan
23
answered Translation of “settling in”
Jan
21
awarded  Scholar
Jan
21
accepted Audio maps of spanish dialects?
Jan
19
comment Translation of “too good to be true”
I thought it was traditional... at least it's also popular in Mexico almallanera.org/refranes.htm
Jan
18
revised Words for boat, ship, and other seafaring vessels
formatted list of translated words
Jan
18
comment Spanish abbreviations of days of the week
On the contrary, the two-letters forms is the most used in my experience (Argentina).
Jan
18
suggested suggested edit on Words for boat, ship, and other seafaring vessels
Jan
18
comment Translating “how is …?” and “how was …?”
Another verb that is sometimes used here is "andar" "¿Cómo anda el tráfico?" "¿Cómo anduvo la reunión" - though this would rather correspond to "How did the meeting go?"
Jan
18
comment shy: tímido vs. reservado vs. vergonzoso vs. penoso
+1 "Penoso" means something completely different from "shy" also here (Argentina).
Jan
18
comment Translation of “too good to be true”
+1 For once, the literal translation works. And in this context, there is also a popular saying that might be used (but not as translation) "Cuando la limosna es grande hasta el santo desconfía" .
Jan
18
comment Translation of “be nice” (said to children)
Same in Argentina (only different stress, because of voseo: "portate bien" = "comportate")
Jan
18
comment What is the difference between allí and ahí (“there”)?
All this is ok, but it's also subtle and a little artificial. And the difference varies (or vanishes) with regions and ages. In Argentina, both are practically synonims, only that 'ahí' is more informal and common.
Jan
18
comment What is the difference between allí and ahí (“there”)?
... and don't forget allá
Jan
17
comment Armpit: sobaco vs. axila
In Argentina "sobaco" is much more informal, almost vulgar. You'd never hear it in a deodorant ad, or in medical speak.
Jan
17
answered Choosing between “Mirar” and “Ver”