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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 59 votes cast
Mar
28
asked How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
Mar
28
accepted Use of “Veni”? Is it a real word?
Mar
22
asked Use of “Veni”? Is it a real word?
Mar
22
comment What would be a good way to express “You can't get something out of nothing”?
@TomasNarros, I would say "ask for pears from the elm." I like that expression though.
Mar
22
accepted How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
Mar
7
awarded  Commentator
Mar
7
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
This is what I've heard, but I'm always very wary of trusting the English word is actually used when I hear people around here (in Texas) use the English.
Mar
7
asked How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
Mar
7
comment What's the difference between rezar and orar? Are there any other ways to say 'to pray'?
I lived with a missionary family in Venezuela and usually heard "orar."
Mar
7
answered Ser and estar for location
Mar
7
comment “Fall in love with” (non-romantic)
There is a thread on this site specifically addressing the "cute" portion of your questions here: spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/1840/…
Mar
7
comment Translation of “be nice” (said to children)
I had a friend from Mexico who commonly said "Pórtate bien, chica," when we were saying goodbye.
Mar
4
answered What exactly are the “passive se” and “impersonal se”?
Mar
1
comment Why is 'estoy' used when saying “I'm related to”
One helpful rule that applies in the case of "Ella es mi suegra/hermana/hija" and "Es mi esposa" is that if the subject and predicate are both nouns (or pronouns), then ser will be used instead of estar. This rule is very helpful because it can be applied in many situations when deciding about ser and estar.
Mar
1
answered Usage of plural in collective objects?
Mar
1
comment Translation of “to be fluent (in a language)”
Can you use "tener fluidez" and does that change the meaning more to mastery of the language instead of a flowing manner of speaking? For example, "John tiene fluidez en el idioma." This is the phrase one of my college profs suggested.
Mar
1
comment What is the difference between parece and pareciera?
What tense would be used after "Pareciera que"? Past (imperfect) subjunctive? Would it be "Pareciera que tuvieras la respuesta correcta"? (It would appear that you have the correct answer.)
Mar
1
comment How do you say “I'm gonna get you!”?
I chose this answer because it referenced the location it was used, and it seems like it will be the most useful for my area.
Mar
1
comment When to use “tratar de” and when to use “intentar” for “to try to”?
@Serdar, I would say "I have never tried..." and "I have never tasted..." would both be correct translations for "Nunca he probado..." when speaking of a food.
Mar
1
awarded  Editor